Andy Warhol at the Tate Modern, London

Stimulate your artistic side with virtual tours of the world’s top exhibitions and leading galleries

There’s more to culture in the time of Covid-19 than Netflix and Instagram so expand your horizons and educate your aesthetics with some of the best exhibitions available to explore online, from Warhol to Manet.

Andy Warhol at the Tate Modern, London
American pop artists Andy Warhol’s 15 minutes of fame continues to run into overtime, with this comprehensive exhibition set to further extend the father of The Factory’s deadline. Videos of the exhibition curators, portraits of Debbie Harry, Dolly Parton and Elizabeth Taylor, along with self-portraits and soup cans will have your imagination firing, or at the very least popping.

Louise Bourgeois Drawings 1947-2007, Hauser & Wirth
It’s only fitting that the 14 drawings created in relative isolation by the French-American artist Louise Bourgeois can now be enjoyed in social solitude. Eyes staring at the spectator, abstract swirls, imaginary landscapes and a message of love convey Bourgeois’ immense talent, exercised across seven decades, while an accompanying video enhances the enlightening experience. 

KAWS: Companionship and Loneliness at the NGV
American designer and artist Brian Donnelly is better known as KAWS, but if that still doesn’t ring any bells his humorous, colour-popping characters in bright paintings and sculptures will ring bells, loudly. Cartoon-like and highly collectable, KAWS’ work appeals to fans of art, fashion and popular culture. This experience takes you through the acclaimed exhibition by the National gallery of Victoria, as though you were actually there.

Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams, Musee des Arts et Decoratifs, Paris 
Take a moment to immerse yourself in 70 years of clothes, photographs, accessories and incredible beauty from the master of Haute Couture. This phenomenal collection encompasses the work of Dior and his successors, Yves Saint Laurent, Marc Bohan, Emanuel Ungaro, John Galliano and Maria Grazia Chiuri.

Gerhard Richter: Painting After All, Met, New York
Regarded as one of the world’s greatest living artists, the work of German Gerhard Richter encompasses photorealistic paintings, photographs and glasswork. Highlights include Richter’s acclaimed works Uncle Rudi (1965), Betty (1977), and September (2005). 

Keith Haring –Jean Michel Basquiat: Crossing Lines at the NGV
This exhibition of two of the most influential artists from the eighties thrums with pure New York, pre-gentrification, energy. The raw paintings deal with issues surrounding racism, sexuality and the onset of AIDS. There are also photographs from the downtown scene, with the omnipresent influence, Andy Warhol, and Basquiat’s girlfriend Madonna. 

The Courthauld Institute of Art Collection, London
In the week following isolation in the UK thanks to the Coronavirus, The Courthauld Gallery’s virtual tour received 723 per cent more visitors than the previous week. No wonder, with an impressive collection containing Vincent van Gogh’s Self-Portrait with Bandaged Ear, Édouard Manet’s and Thomas Gainsborough portraits.

Time After Time: A Subverted Plan, Christina Read, McLeavey Gallery, Wellington
Wellington’s McLeavey Gallery has launched its first online exhibition to cope with Covid-19, featuring the uplifting work of artist Christina Read. Time After Time features 15 hand-painted collages based on drawings and doodles Read made while pondering unfulfilled plans. “My process is very laboured and time-consuming, but I work hard at not making it look so,” Read says.

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Get ready to have fresh floral bouquets brightening your home

Sometimes you don’t know how much you love something until you can’t have it anymore. We always knew how much we’d miss dining out with friends and what a loss takeaways would be but we didn’t realise how much we’d miss fresh flowers.

So it’s with much relief that alongside the shift to Level Three comes the reopening of one of our favourite florists. The brainchild (or is that flowerchild?) of Millie Austin, La Femme Fleur flower truck has been based in Coxs Bay for six years, selling fresh flowers from New Zealand’s best growers.

Austin’s signature bouquets are stunning, luxurious and can now be ordered safely under Level Three via the website. Choose from one of La Femme Fleur’s four colour profiles and let their talented team do the rest. Delivered around the city, this is a great way to not only treat yourself but to show those outside your bubble how much you miss them.

Now that we’re all spending more time at home it’s worth signing up for a flower subscription service. Delivered to your door each week, fortnight, or month, La Femme Fleur’s flower subscriptions are designed to fill your home with the most beautiful seasonal flowers at all times. Their long last local blooms will brighten your isolation week in and out.

During Level Three the flower truck is moving its wholesale offering online too, so you can have access to the best, freshest New Zealand grown flowers every day. After each flower auction the team will create take-home bundles in two palates: whites and greens or bright and bold. The bundles will come in three sizes – $50, $75 and $100 – and they’ll be using contactless pick up from Coxs Bay.

“The flower truck has become such a big part of the local community I wanted to create a way for my regulars to still get their favourite flowers to fill their homes,” says Millie Austin. “I thought this was especially important while we remain in our bubbles and people want to brighten their lives.”

The bundles can be distributed across different vases around the home or be assembled as a single, striking arrangement. Keep an eye on La Femme Fleur’s social media channels for updates on what’s in the bundles each week.

Order the home bundles by emailing [email protected] or calling 02 20775375.

The New Zealand flower industry has been put under huge pressure by the effects of Covid-19 with growers having to destroy hundreds of thousands of dollars of stock. Now you can support local growers and fill your home with beautiful flowers.

“The impact of Corona virus on flower growers and florists has been huge. Now that we’re able to operate again under Level Three we need Aucklanders to come out and support local businesses so our industry can survive.”

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Getting to Know: Architect Jess Walker on Killing Eve and Turkish baths

As the creative force behind architectural firm Bureaux, which she founded with friend and fellow architect Maggie Carroll in 2010, Jess Walker has a cultivated eye for design. Here we ask Walker to look beyond blueprints and reveal her plans for happiness.

My personal style can be defined by as
A domesticated Monica Bellucci character on vacation in the Italian countryside.

The last thing I bought and loved was
An Akari H pendant light from the Noguchi Museum that I now have hanging in my dining room.

Jess’s dining room with her Akari H pendant light

My favourite room in my house is
My bath with the afternoon sun and a book.

My favourite app is
I am always slightly terrified but also fascinated by the Apple Health aps ability to have more of a grasp on what my body has been doing than I do.

An indulgence I would never forgo is 
Scented candles.

John Lautner’s Sheats-Goldstein residence

An unforgettable place I visited was
American architect John Lautner’s Sheats-Goldstein residence in Los Angeles.

Maison de Verre

Next place I’d like to go to
Maison de Verre in Paris.

If I had to limit my shopping to one neighbourhood in one city it would be
Omotesando, Tokyo.

Brookbanks windows

An object I would never part with is
I have a number of special artworks made by clever friends – if I had to pick one it would be a sculpture of windows by Stephen Brookbanks.

My style icon is
My style icons are a small number of women in my life who have brilliant minds, love to dance and love to cook. A fabulous dress, gumboots, cocktail in hand traipsing through the garden to collect herbs to garnish a lovingly prepared meal. This is my perfect woman.

The best book I’ve read in the last year is 
The Overstory by Richard Powers.

I can’t miss an episode of
Killing Eve.

In my fridge you’ll always find
Homemade condiments.

I recently discovered
That I am very happy being in lockdown, in my house, with my family. 

A gadget I can’t do without is
The robot vacuum cleaner I have yet to purchase that works well on timber floors and rugs and will tidy up after my dog and children.

Giorgio Morandi
Donald Judd
Anni-Albers

The one artist whose work I would collect is (if price is not an issue)
It’s far too hard to answer this question with just one – it would be a collection of perhaps Giorgio Morandi, Donald Judd, Tomislav Nikolic and an Anni Albers print.

The last meal out I had that truly impressed me was
Albertos Lounge in Sydney, followed a few days later by a perfect last supper at Bar Celeste the night before going into isolation and then lockdown, many nights ago.

The podcasts I listen to are 
I’m not sure I’ve ever listened to a podcast; I prefer to read or watch.

Kokeshi

I have a collection of 
Kokeshi – traditional Japanese wooden dolls. It’s a collection I have started for my daughter.

The best gift I ever received was
Peter Zumthor’s complete works – which comes in a collection of 5 volumes, which my husband lovingly lugged home from a bookstore in the US.

The beauty product I can’t live without is
Zoe and Bios face Oil.

The last music I downloaded was
John Prine

If I wasn’t doing what I am, I would be
A florist. 

My favourite pampering treatment is
A Turkish bath – preferably in Turkey.

Image credit: Header Image: Jackie Meiring

Design


Everything we’ve got our eyes on from Studio Italia’s much-anticipated annual sale

Powersurge is having a special sale, and these are all the pieces we’re coveting

Here’s why your living room needs Patricia Urquiola’s enchanting new sofa
Moooi Meshmatics chandelier from ECC, Space Copenhagen Mater Trumpet coat stand from Cult Design and Vitra Wiggle stool from Matisse

Classic details and an artistic approach offer cocoon comfort in this sky high apartment

Interior Designer Alicia Holgar paused when given the challenge of creating a stylish cocoon for this apartment owner’s artworks and books in a style that responded to the aesthetics of legendary architect Harry Seidler. The only solution was to spend time in the Brisbane apartment bulding, absorbing the needs of the space and letting the fluid floor plan point towards custom pieces for the relaxed environment.

Moooi Meshmatics chandelier from ECC, Space Copenhagen Mater Trumpet coat stand from Cult Design and Vitra Wiggle stool from Matisse
Moooi Meshmatics chandelier from ECC, Space Copenhagen Mater Trumpet coat stand from Cult Design and Vitra Wiggle side chair from Matisse

The soothing and sophisticated result is one of light-filled luxury, with an impressive impact thanks to a cantilevered wall, acting as an extension of the architecture and extending Seidler’s own sinuous curves.

Tapping into the owner’s art appreciation, Holgar commissioned LA-based artist Jessalyn Brooks to create a mural, The Avians, which took its cues from the apartment’s bird’s eye outlook.

Catellani & Smith Lederam S2 pendant from ECC, Knoll Cesca chairs from Studio Italia and Serge Mouille Lampadaire Droit floor lamp from Cult Design
Catellani & Smith Lederam S2 pendant from ECC and ‘The Avians’ original mural by Jessalyn Brooks

The mural sits easily among other artworks, such as Ryan Hoffmann’s brilliant blue circular piece in the lounge area and the ceramics by A Ceramics and Guido Deleu on the Den Holm entry table, which again echoes the building’s curves.

Catellani & Smith Lederam S2 pendant from ECC and Knoll Cesca chairs from Studio Italia

Alongside the custom pieces a selection of classic furniture, such as the Wiggle Chair, the Barcelona Chair and Cesca dining chairs add gravitas to this castle in the sky.

“The space feels impressive but not in the way you would expect,” Holgar says. “Through pushing boundaries and utilising the element of surprise, the calm palette is enriched by a sculptural sophistication, which adds new layers of depth, light and shade.”

Vitra Wiggle side chair from Matisse
Knoll Barcelona chair from Studio Italia
Sculptor Norman Carlberg inspired entry table handmade by Den Holm, Nanimarquina Stone wool rug from Cult Design and Vitra Belleville chair from Matisse
Louis Poulsen Yuh table lamp from Cult Design
Stellar Works QT Chillax low chair and ‘Art Quartet #4’ 2018 by McLean Edwards artwork
Foscarini Rituals wall lamp from ECC and Zanotta Teti side table from Studio Italia
Foscarini Rituals wall lamp from ECC

Design


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Powersurge is having a special sale, and these are all the pieces we’re coveting

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Four unique ways to take corn on the cob from basic to brilliant

If there’s one vegetable that speaks of joy, it’s the bright, sunshine yellow corn on the cob. With plenty of corn still available in the supermarkets, why not trial something new?

All recipes serve 4 people and are cooked without the husks.

1. With Smoky Butter
Start grilling the corn on the BBQ and while they’re cooking, in a small bowl, combine a tablespoon of softened butter, the juice and zest of one lime, half a teaspoon of smoked paprika, salt and pepper. Once the corn is cooked (in your chosen method), slather with the butter mixture.

2. With Herbed Goats Cheese Butter
Elevate your butter combination with this deliciously creamy and richer rendition. Combine 3 tablespoons of softened butter, 3 tablespoons of soft, herbed goats cheese, 2 cloves of diced garlic (lightly toasted in a pan prior), zest of half a lemon, and a pinch of Himalayan salt. Spread over either boiled or microwaved corn while still hot.

3. With a Pesto Rub
At this time of year, it’s likely that you have an abundance of basil in the herb garden, and if you’re up for making your own pesto (or alternatively obtaining a pre-made pottle) this recipe is a delicious, summery take. Once the corn is cooked, brush a layer of pesto on the cob, and shave some good quality Parmigiana-Reggiano on top.

4. With an Asian Marinade
Introduce Asian-inspired flair with this delicious glaze. Add 2 tablespoons of Hoisin sauce, 2 tablespoons of runny honey, 1 tablespoons soy sauce, and half a diced chilli for that extra kick. Place the uncooked corn onto a sheet of tinfoil, drizzle the marinade, and wrap up individually into their own parcels. Grill on the BBQ until cooked.

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The five crucial steps for cooking the perfect steak

Even the least technically gifted chefs know the importance of being able to cook a good steak. It is a rite of passage after all. While everyone, from Heston to Jamie, tends to observe a personal set of rules, there are some cardinal directions for achieving steak perfection.

1. Season and sit
Remove your steaks from the fridge, pour olive oil over both sides and season generously with salt and pepper (dousing with oil first will help the seasoning stick). Allow the meat to rest for about 20 minutes, so as to come up to room temperature. This way, it will cook more evenly. NB, sea salt flakes are an absolute must.

Lodge Square Grill Pan from The Studio of Tableware

2. Use the right equipment
Two words: cast iron. To get the best tasting steak, it needs to have a good ‘crust’ and the best kind comes from a cast iron skillet. Our favourite is the Lodge Square Grill Pan from Studio of Tableware. As the meat cooks to a crispy outer layer, it picks up a deeply savoury, caramelised flavour that you might not ever recover from. Investing in a good pan is imperative.

3. Butter her up
Again, we come to the matter of the crust. In pursuit of said deep golden outer hue, a generous amount of butter is involved. Heat the pan until it is very hot, add a couple of tablespoons of oil before adding a sizeable knob of butter. The oil will help prevent the butter from burning.

4. The act itself
Throwing a steak into a pan of sizzling hot (but not burning) butter should incite a true sizzle. If not, the game is already over. And no matter what your dad might have taught you, it’s vital to remember: thou shalt not cook a steak for the same amount of time on each side. Once your steak has hit the grill, resist the temptation to touch it until it has cooked for five minutes on one side. Then turn it over before cooking for three. Of course, if you prefer your meat to be anything other than medium rare, adjust accordingly.

5. Let it be
Once removed from the skillet, slather your steaks in fresh herbs and butter (alternatively, we suggest a slice of Lewis Road Creamery’s, Sean Connolly-formulated steak butter). Leave to rest for at least five minutes before serving them with the flavour filled, buttery juices.

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Get your seafood fix with this Salmon Tiradito recipe from Azabu

As longtime fans of Azabu, we’re seriously missing their Japanese/ Peruvian cuisine, in particular the fresh raw fish dishes they are famed for. Thanks to Savor Goods, you can now get your hands on the fresh seafood from Azabu’s fishmongers, simply order their Seafood Selection box and be ready to try your hand at recreating some of their famed dishes, starting with the much loved Tiradito.

Tiradito marries Japanese sashimi with Peruvian ceviche. Instead of smaller chunks of fish found in a ceviche, tiradito features large sashimi-style slices. Instead of marinating the fish as you would for ceviche, tiradito calls for finishing it with a bright chilli-citrus sauce. We finish ours with a tangy passionfruit syrup.

Salmon Tiradito
Serves 4

Ingredients
200g sashimi-grade Salmon fillet, skinned
1⁄2 Butternut squash
20g Coconut cream
20g Passionfruit syrup
Small bunch of Coriander

Leche de Tigre Milk
4 small passionfruit, juice and seeds (around 50g in total)
35g white Fish
5g Garlic, peeled
4g Ginger, peeled
6g Red chilli, chopped
100ml Lime juice
15g Japanese mayo
2g Sea salt

Method
1. Place fish pieces, garlic, ginger, chilli, lime juice, Japanese mayo and flaky sea salt in a blender.
2. Blend to desired consistency, which should take approximately 30 seconds, enough time to bring out aroma and flavour but not the colour and season to taste.
3. Peel the butternut squash. Using a zester, cut fine strips of squash rather like spaghetti.
4. Line a plate with absorbent paper.
5. Add sunflower oil to a pan and heat to 140°C (note – use a deep pan and do not fill more than 1/3 full as the hot oil will rise to the surface as the squash is added).
6. Fry the butternut squash spaghetti for about 1 minute until lightly browned, transfer to the lined plate. The squash strands will not be crispy at this stage but do not worry – they will crisp up as they cool down. Season with sea salt.
7. Remove any residual brown flesh from the salmon fillet.
8. Cut the salmon into thin slices and arrange them in a single row over each of the four serving plates.
9. For each plate, spoon 2 to 3 tablespoons of the passionfruit & Leche de Tigre over the salmon.
10. Dot with a few passionfruit seeds around the plate, arrange a line of crispy butternut squash spaghetti and scatter a few sprigs of coriander over the squash and on the plate.
11. Sprinkle some sea salt flakes.

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This Spicy Sausage Rigatoni recipe from NSP is the perfect family feast

Bring some Italian atmosphere into your home with this comforting dish from Non Solo Pizza. To take your meal to the next level, order one of Savor Good’s Italian staples boxes that include the ingredients you need for culinary success. Bellisima!

Rigatoni with Spicy Sausage
Serves 6

Ingredients
1 tbsp Olive oil
1 large Onion, chopped
3 Garlic cloves, chopped
1kg fresh hot Italian sausages, casings removed
½ cup Red wine
1 400g can of diced tomatoes
1 400g can of crushed tomatoes with added puree
4 cups Rigatoni
2 cups (packed) Fresh rocket, stems removed
½ cup fresh basil leaves, thinly sliced
1 tbsp fresh oregano, chopped
½ cup Parmesan cheese, freshly grated

Method
1. Heat oil in a heavy large pot over medium heat.
2. Add onion, cook until translucent, about 4 minutes.
3. Add garlic; stir 1 minute.
4. Add sausage; cook until browned, breaking up with the back of a spoon, about 5 minutes.
5. Drain drippings from pot.
6. Add wine, diced tomatoes with juice, and crushed tomatoes; increase heat and bring to boil.
7. Reduce heat to low and simmer 30 minutes to blend flavours, stirring occasionally.
8. Meanwhile, cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water until tender but still firm to bite, stirring occasionally. Drain.
9. Stir pasta, rocket, basil, and oregano into the tomato sauce.
10. Simmer until rocket wilts, stirring often, about 2 minutes.
11. Season with salt and pepper. Transfer to a large bowl. Sprinkle with Parmesan.

Gastronomy


Three delicious new dishes you need to try this weekend

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Left to Right: Deb and Mary Lou of Bassike

The founders of brand to love Bassike share their thoughts on Birkenstocks and Seinfeld

For more than 10 years Deborah Sams and Mary-Lou Ryan have pioneered ethically-made, elevated basics, with organic cotton T-shirts, cosy knits and practical pants with a fashion edge with their brand Bassike, available in New Zealand at Superette. While the rest of the world is catching up with their sustainable, stripped back approach we pulled them aside to unearth their inspirations.

Deborah Sams – co-founder and creative director womenswear

My personal style can be defined as
The way I design Bassike collections. Relaxed and casual with an androgynous feel.

The last thing I bought and loved was
A pair of Nike Air Jordan high tops. 

An unforgettable place I visited was
Rome, it is my favourite city in the world. 

Kauai, Hawaii

Next place I’d like to go to
Kauai in Hawaii. 

An object I would never part with is
My engagement ring. 

My favourite app is
Sadhguru – an Indian mystic that I follow. 

An indulgence I would never forgo is
A lavender and Himalayan salt bath at the end of a long day. 

If I had to limit my shopping to one neighbourhood in one city it would be
Harajuku, Tokyo. 

My style icon is
Cool people in general – I don’t really have one particular style Icon as such. 

The best book I’ve read in the past year is
Sadhguru – Inner Engineering: A Yogi’s Guide to Joy

I can’t miss an episode of
Seinfeld

In my fridge you’ll always find
Dark mint chocolate. 

My favourite room in my house is
My bedroom. 

I recently discovered
The joy of bike riding again. 

The one artist whose work I would collect is (if price is not an issue)
Picasso. 

The last meal out I had that truly impressed me was
Dinner at The Apollo in Potts Point, NSW.

The podcasts I listen to are
Ted Talks Daily
Ten Percent Happier podcast with Dan Harris
Sadhguru’s podcast
The BoF podcast
BoF Drive
Living Fearlessly with Lisa McDonald
I could keep going….

The best gift I ever received was
My son, Jett Jackie. 

The beauty product I can’t live without is
The Travelista body balm

The last music I downloaded was
The Strokes – The New Abnormal

If I wasn’t doing what I am, I would be
A Pomerianian breeder or living on a farm growing blueberries.

My favourite pampering treatment is
Massage followed by hypnotherapy. 

Mary Lou Ryan – bassike co-founder and creative director menswear 

My personal style can be defined by
A definite menswear influence.

The last thing I bought and loved was
The Birkenstock Bostons

An unforgettable place I visited was
Tulum, Mexico.

Next place I’d like to go to
I would love to go heli-skiing in New Zealand. 

An object I would never part with is
My grandmothers ring.

My favourite app is 
The Kelee meditation app.

An indulgence I would never forgo is
Chocolate. 

If I had to limit my shopping to one neighbourhood in one city it would be
Shinjuku, Japan.

My style icon is
No one in particular, but I do love skate culture.

The best book I’ve read in the last year is
I have been reading my son The Magic Faraway Tree by Enid Blyton.

In my fridge you’ll always find
A chilled Italian red wine. 

I recently discovered
Social Distancing works.

The one artist whose work I would collect is (if price is not an issue)
Stanislava Pinchuk. aka MISO.

The last meal out I had that truly impressed me was
I always love Fred’s (in Paddington, NSW). Feels home cooked and authentic.

The podcast I listen to is
Expanded with Lacy Phillips. 

The best gift I ever received was
Having my 3 children. 

The beauty product I can’t live without is
The Water Cream by Tatcha, from Mecca.

The last music I downloaded was
Listening to The New Abnormal by The Strokes.

If I wasn’t doing what I am, I would be
Be a full-time Mum.

My favourite pampering treatment is
Facial. 

I have a collection of
Old Japanese denim, I have collected for many years now.

Image credit: Header Image: Bart Celestino

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The ultimate triple-layered carrot cake recipe that’s three times the fun

When it comes to carrot cake, it’s all about striking the perfect balance between healthy-tasting and sinfully decadent. It must be moist, sweet and carry a flavour full of spices that linger on the palate. And while vibrant orange carrots and crunchy nuts should be laced throughout, it should never feel overloaded. As far as frosting is concerned, a cream cheese variety is the only type that should top a cake of this kind, and in our opinion, the thicker, the better.

So, with every other baked good already covered, we thought it was time to divulge our own foolproof recipe for what we consider to be the perfect carrot cake. Scrumptious, decadent and a true crowd-pleaser, this is a recipe that is sure to impress everyone in your bubble.

Triple-Layered Carrot Cake
Ingredients

For the cake
450g of grated carrots (peeled)
310g of standard flour
3 tsp of cinnamon
½ tsp of allspice
1 tsp of salt
1 tsp of baking powder
½ tsp of baking soda
200g of light brown sugar
100g of white sugar
3 eggs (room temperature)
240mL of vegetable or canola oil
150g of raisins (optional)
200g of chopped walnuts
1 can of crushed pineapple (225g)

For the cream cheese frosting
225g of Lewis Road Creamery unsalted butter
340g of cream cheese, room temperature (NOT spreadable
1½ tsp of vanilla extract
240g of icing sugar
200g of crushed walnuts

Method
1.
Preheat the oven to 180 ℃ fan-bake. Grease three 8-inch round cake pans and line with baking paper.
2. Grate the carrots finely and set aside.
3. In a large bowl, sift the flour, cinnamon, allspice, salt, baking powder and baking soda and gently stir until combined.
4. Take another large bowl and in it, beat the brown sugar, white sugar, and eggs with an electric mixer on medium speed until just combined.
5. Keep the mixer running and slowly pour in the vegetable or canola oil.
6. Lower the speed of the mixer to medium-low and add the flour mixture a little bit at a time into the wet ingredients. Beat until just incorporated and stop mixing when there is just a small amount of flour visible.
7. If you want to add raisins, now is the time. Be sure to roll them in a tablespoon of flour to keep them from sinking to the bottom of the cake while it’s baking. If not, skip this step.
8. After the raisins (optional), add the grated carrots, walnuts and pineapple to the batter and use a rubber spatula to fold the ingredients together.
9. Divide the cake batter evenly between the prepared pans and smooth the tops with your spatula.
10. Bake the cakes all at once for 25-30 minutes. Insert a toothpick into their centres to check if it comes out clean. If so, they’re ready.
11. Let the cakes partially cool on a wire rack before removing them from their pans and leaving them on the rack to cool completely.
12. While the cakes cool, make the icing. In a large bowl, beat together the butter, cream cheese, and vanilla with an electric mixer on medium-low speed. Once combined, increase the speed to medium-high, until the mixture becomes light and fluffy.
13. Gradually add in the icing sugar, preferably 60g at a time to keep the sugar from flying everywhere. This will also allow the icing to become incredibly smooth.
14. Assemble the cake by stacking them one of top of the other with a layer of icing in between each. Be generous with the icing in order to ensure the stacking is even.
15. Once all three cakes are stacked, add icing to the top and sides and sprinkle the chopped walnuts all over.
16) Refrigerate for at least 40 minutes, so that the icing can set. And note that keeping this cake in the fridge will not make it dry.

Gastronomy


Three delicious new dishes you need to try this weekend

Negroni but not as you know it, this new brand is giving the classic cocktail a barrel-aged twist

new

Win a delicious feast to celebrate Taco Medic’s new outpost