Are we willing to exchange privacy for convenience? We delve into the concerns around technology

All of us, at some point, have mocked the older generation for their inability to get on board with technology. ‘Luddites!’ We have exclaimed, scoffing at their fear of social media as we parade around with our iPads and harp on endlessly about our revolutionary UberEats deliveries and effortless online retail experiences.

Yet now, as concerns regarding technology’s risks to privacy increase exponentially, we’re finding ourselves filled with the same dread and concern, feeling the same fears we had been warned about. And as we are served a slice of warm, humble pie from our all-knowing grandmothers, we too, are left wondering, is all this technological advancement really worth the risk to our privacy?  

It is disconcerting when, after nattering with friends about our unbridled love for the classic cinnamon swirl, we are greeted with advertisements for local bakeries upon opening Facebook a few hours later. It is unsettling when we read the news to discover that, confirming the popular belief, Amazon really is recording our conversations.

Such was the case in May of this year when a Portland couple’s mundane discussion concerning hardwood flooring was recorded and sent to a colleague without their knowledge — something which Amazon still maintains was a one-off malfunction. It is unnerving that governments are becoming more like Orwell’s prediction, where wire-tapped phone calls and 24/7 security cameras have become the norm.

It definitely doesn’t sit right knowing that Uber has admitted to tracking our locations even when we’re not using its app, and the fact that wearable fitness trackers and smartwatches are collecting our data and sending it on to god-knows-where leaves us on edge, to say the least. Don’t even get us started on the illicit harvesting of our personal data by an incredibly prominent, previously mentioned social media network, (yes, we’re talking about the serious allegations against Cambridge Analytica and its potentially illegal activity around both the Brexit and Trump campaigns.) 

Unnerving, disconcerting and unsettling are just a few of the feelings we’ve experienced while struggling to come to terms with this new and relatively uncharted technology territory. Funny, then, that in 2010, Eric Schmidt, (then chief executive of Google), said that the company’s policy was “to get right up to the creepy line and not cross it.” It may seem as though we’re so far beyond the creepy line that the line no longer exists, but what is perhaps more accurate, is to say that over time, our definition of creepy has altered. Twenty years ago, for example, the mere thought of putting a camera in our homes would have invoked a sort of disturbed recoil. Now, a home without a camera-wielding device is as uncommon as a kitchen without a cupboard crammed with a colossal melange of hoarded supermarket bags. 

As our definition of creepy mutates, so too, does our definition of privacy. Generally speaking, the traditional concept of the term is anchored in a right to be left alone. But now, a word once synonymous with a lack of disturbance is having its meaning eroded — and this unnavigable grey area has led to a lot of questions. Should we be worried about safety and our online identities and reputations? What about our IRL identities and reputations? Is there an opt-out button? Where does creepiness end and criminal begin? 

Honestly, solid answers are few and far between. What we do know is that governments and industries specialising in finance, transportation and health care have all had to fork out for larger security budgets in an attempt to prevent cyber attacks. Away from the big companies, homeowners are feeling threatened by the new breed of burglars — cybercriminals able to hack into home device systems. While the growing number of people using banking apps to manage their finances face a growing risk of being subjected to online fraud. 

As far as legality is concerned, governments are trying their damnedest to keep up with the changing tides. The New Zealand Parliament, in March last year, revisited the Privacy Act 1993 with the aim of strengthening privacy protections, stating that the rise of the internet and the digital economy has transformed the use of personal information. This process was a result of the same drivers that lead to Europe’s widely discussed General Data Protection Regulation law, which was brought into effect in the spring of 2018 and was met with a very similar response. The general consensus is that, while changing the law is a step in the right direction, the reforms need to go further if they are going to properly address the public’s concern. Basically, Parliament is giving it the old college try but the sad truth is that legislation will never keep up with the increasing rate of technological advances, and so, as far as the law is concerned, we will never truly be protected.

Fighting for privacy in this day and age is a quixotic endeavour, and regardless of whether it is achieved, mass surveillance, data-harvesting and a multitude of other dystopian distress will soon become our new normal. The question we need to be asking is not whether or not it’s happening, but whether or not we care. Or, rather, do we care enough? More often than not, when privacy policies appear, the legalise gets swatted away without a second thought. We’re quick to lambaste Facebook for eavesdropping on our private conversations and yet knowing somebody who has actually read every set of Terms & Conditions they’re served through the app, deleted the app or even closed their account is as rare as finding someone who isn’t on Instagram. 

Take FaceApp, for example. The AI-powered selfie-editing app first went viral in 2017, shortly after which, issues were raised about its privacy. This year, the app resurfaced under a new guise, now accelerating the ages of its users as opposed to beautifying them, but the same privacy problems remained. Yet despite the raised concerns over data sharing and privacy invasion — it has been claimed that the app can share any information on your phone, from your web history to the images in your camera roll, with third parties — millions continued to transform themselves into silver-haired octogenarians. Because, well, god forbid we miss out on the latest viral trend. 

 It seems that, in reality, we’re quite happy to pay for trivial conveniences with pieces of personal information. Despite the complaints, most of us are beginning to accept that privacy is the currency of our online personas. Technological advancement is a risky business, and its disturbing nature is without question — but if we’re not willing to make any changes to our online habits, how do we expect anyone else to? 

Culture


What’s the deal with ASMR? We shed some light on this fascinating sensory trend

Need a new series? Add these addictive TV shows to your watchlist this weekend

What should you read next? These 5 engrossing novels deserve a place on your bookshelf

Part Two — Seoul: An Unorthodox Food Tour by @eatlitfood

As a person who is Korean myself, exploring and sharing the culinary scene of South Korea has always been a life-long dream of mine. Korean pop culture has faced a dramatic rise in popularity over the past couple of years, however, the cuisine still has a long way to go.

Follow me as I share some delicacies that go outside the realms of just Korean BBQ and fried chicken. Instead, I will share a range of dining adventures, from sharing seats and tables at the local markets to exclusive fine-dining at two-Michelin starred restaurants.

Gwangjang Markets
88 Changgyeonggung-ro, Jongno 4(sa)-ga, Jongno-gu, Seoul, South Korea
Buchon Yukhoe
165-11 Jongno 4(sa)-ga, Jongno-gu, Seoul, South Korea
Jungsik
11 Seolleung-ro 158-gil, Cheongdam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul, South Korea

Gastronomy


This new Miann opening is bringing the sweet life to Ponsonby Central

From perfect pasta to mouthwatering mezze, these are the best comfort food takeaways to order right now

Treat yourself to a Powersurge online shop, and receive a generous restaurant voucher for paying it forward

Part One — Seoul: An Unorthodox Food Tour by @eatlitfood

As a person who is Korean myself, exploring and sharing the culinary scene of South Korea has always been a life-long dream of mine. Korean pop culture has faced a dramatic rise in popularity over the past couple of years, however, the cuisine still has a long way to go.

Follow me as I share some delicacies that go outside the realms of just Korean BBQ and fried chicken. Instead, I will share a range of dining adventures, from sharing seats and tables at the local markets to exclusive fine-dining at two-Michelin starred restaurants.

Gwangjang Markets
88 Changgyeonggung-ro, Jongno 4(sa)-ga, Jongno-gu, Seoul, South Korea
Buchon Yukhoe
165-11 Jongno 4(sa)-ga, Jongno-gu, Seoul, South Korea
Jungsik
11 Seolleung-ro 158-gil, Cheongdam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul, South Korea

Gastronomy


This new Miann opening is bringing the sweet life to Ponsonby Central

From perfect pasta to mouthwatering mezze, these are the best comfort food takeaways to order right now

Treat yourself to a Powersurge online shop, and receive a generous restaurant voucher for paying it forward

Part Three — Seoul: An Unorthodox Food Tour by @eatlitfood

As a person who is Korean myself, exploring and sharing the culinary scene of South Korea has always been a life-long dream of mine. Korean pop culture has faced a dramatic rise in popularity over the past couple of years, however, the cuisine still has a long way to go.

Follow me as I share some delicacies that go outside the realms of just Korean BBQ and fried chicken. Instead, I will share a range of dining adventures, from sharing seats and tables at the local markets to exclusive fine-dining at two-Michelin starred restaurants.

Gwangjang Markets
88 Changgyeonggung-ro, Jongno 4(sa)-ga, Jongno-gu, Seoul, South Korea
Buchon Yukhoe
165-11 Jongno 4(sa)-ga, Jongno-gu, Seoul, South Korea
Jungsik
11 Seolleung-ro 158-gil, Cheongdam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul, South Korea

Gastronomy


This new Miann opening is bringing the sweet life to Ponsonby Central

From perfect pasta to mouthwatering mezze, these are the best comfort food takeaways to order right now

Treat yourself to a Powersurge online shop, and receive a generous restaurant voucher for paying it forward
Khalid

We round up the cultural events that are not to be missed this November

Landmark musical concerts, thought-provoking festivals, hotly-anticipated movie releases (shining a light on some incredible homegrown talent), breathtaking theatrical performances and more: here’s how you should be upping your cultural intake throughout the month of November.

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Why Don't We

Why Don't We

Why Don't We

Why Don't We

Fans of smooth adolescent pop rejoice, because Zach Herron, Jack Avery, Daniel Seavey, Corbyn Besson, and Jonah Marais – AKA American boy band Why Don’t We – will be bringing their effervescent sound to the ears of Aucklanders come November 25th. All musicians in their own right, the five only became a band in 2016 — and they’ve already amassed a legion of followers (just check their 11+ million monthly streams on Spotify) If that’s not a testament to their appeal, then we don’t know what is.  
For more information and tickets, click here.
29th November, Spark Arena

RNZB’s Hansel & Gretel

RNZB’s Hansel & Gretel

RNZB’s Hansel & Gretel

RNZB’s Hansel & Gretel

Set to be a vividly memorable show, this stunning adaptation of everybody’s favourite fairytale will be the first, full-length ballet score commissioned from a female composer in the history of the Royal New Zealand Ballet. Performed live by the Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra alongside some breathtaking, plié-ing, pirouetting talent, this is local ballet at its finest.
For tickets and more information, click here
6th November until 14th December, ASB Theatre. 

Ford V. Ferrari

Ford V. Ferrari

Ford V. Ferrari

Ford V. Ferrari

Matt Damon and Christian Bale star as American car designer Carroll Shelby and British-born driver Ken Miles, respectively, in this remarkable adaptation of a true story. Together, the duo battle corporate interference, the laws of physics and their individual troubles as they tackle the biggest mission in racing: building a car powerful enough to defeat the dominant Ferrari at the 24 Hours of Le Mans race in France. A gripping story for petrol heads, indeed, but one that’s equally as compelling for automotive novices.
In cinemas from 14th November

NZSO Resurrection

NZSO Resurrection

NZSO Resurrection

NZSO Resurrection

One of the most notable works by renowned, historical composer Gustav Mahler is brought to life in this rousing interpretation by the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra. Carried by Swedish mezzo-soprano Anna Larsson’s magnificent pipes — the world-great is renowned for her Mahler performances — Resurrection is sure to be a piece remembered long after the final note has been struck.
For tickets and more information, click here
23rd November, Auckland Town Hall. 

Sculpture by the Sea

Sculpture by the Sea

Sculpture by the Sea

Sculpture by the Sea

The world’s largest free-to-the-public exhibition, Sydney’s Sculpture By The Sea, is back for another year with a blinding medley of weird and wonderful artworks. One hundred thought-provoking pieces will transform the beaches and rocky outcrops of the iconic Bondi to Tamarama coastal walk, resulting in a breathtaking, two-kilometre-long sculpture park that will inspire and awe in equal measure.
For more information, click here.
On now until 10th November.

U2

U2

U2

U2

Gird your loins (or vocal cords) for a raucous night full of hearty singalongs, because Irish rock collaborative U2 will be delivering a tremendously exhilarating show to New Zealanders. The band will be revisiting their famed Joshua Tree album, with ‘Where the Streets Have No Name’ and ‘With Or Without You’ serving as just two of the numerous classics bound to be played.
For tickets and more information, click here.
8th and 9th November, Mt Smart Stadium. 

Tash Sultana

Tash Sultana

Tash Sultana

Tash Sultana

The sultry sounds of Tash Sultana are returning to Auckland this November, as the Australian multi-hyphenate performer gears up to play Spark Arena fress off the back of her sold-out tour last year. Part of her Flow State World Tour, this explosive show will see the one person powerhouse perform hits from her crowd-pleasing album of the same name, like smash single ‘Jungle’ and funky new single ‘Can’t Buy Happiness’.
For tickets and more information, click here
22nd November, Spark Arena. 

Khalid

Khalid

Khalid

Khalid

He’s only 21, and pop crooner Khalid is already a stadium-filling, Grammy-nominated, double Platinum-certified album-boasting artist. His performances reflect as much, and the Australian and New Zealand legs of his American Teen Tour sold out in 2017 instantaneously.  We’re expecting much of the same hot anticipation for his latest tour Free Spirit, which will see him perform favourites from his new album like ‘Talk’ and John Mayer collab ‘Outta My Head’, so we suggest you swoop in on this one quick.
For more information and tickets, click here
November 20th – 21st, Spark Arena 

Hermitude

Hermitude

Hermitude

Hermitude

New South Wales duo and masters of electronic hip hop, Luke Dubber and Angus Stuart, have just released their energetic single Northern Lights — a homage to early dance and rave music — and an all-encompassing tour to boot. Daring, brash, unique and entirely fresh in all aspects of their creative process, we can only suspect that seeing the twosome in the flesh will be an experience quite unlike anything else. 
For more information and tickets, click here
November 13th, The Powerstation

Swan Lake

Swan Lake

Swan Lake

Swan Lake

Quite possibly the most beloved production in all of ballet’s history, Swan — in any of its guises — is a masterpiece that everyone should see at least once in their lifetime. The cherished classic will be showcased this November at the hands of the Imperial Russian Ballet Company, with Gediminas Taranda, its artistic director, making only slight revisions and subtle variations to the original story. 
For more information and tickets, click here.
31st October – 2nd November Bruce Mason Centre & ASB Theatre

Les Miserables

Les Miserables

Les Miserables

Les Miserables

Another time-honoured, treasured classic, the story of Les Miserables is one that stands the test of time like so few others manage to do. From the film adaptations to the novel itself, the story is incredible in all its forms, but there’s nothing that’s quite as majestic as an all-singing theatrical stage show — hence the furore over Auckland’s imminent production. 
For more information, click here
7th – 30th November, The Civic

Denmark Design

Denmark Design

Denmark Design

Denmark Design

 This October, the Auckland Art Gallery will be paying ode to impeccable Danish design craftsmanship via an all-encompassing exhibition. Spanning centuries, Denmark Design charts developments from the 19th century right up until modern-day, putting over 200 of the most iconic, original Danish household items on display — from the Lego brick to the Panton chair — from some of the country’s most skilful designers and manufacturers.
For more information, click here
On now until 2nd February 2020

British Film Festival

British Film Festival

British Film Festival

British Film Festival

The iconic British Film Festival is launching in New Zealand for the very first time this month with a lineup comprising some seriously stellar content. 28 British films will screen across 22 cinemas nationwide, many of which feature some of Britain’s most renowned acting talent, like Kiera Knightley, Bill Nighy, Kate Beckinsale and Vanessa Redgrave. Particular highlights we can’t wait to see include 2018 drama Farming, music documentary Liam Gallagher: As It Was and this year’s release, Military Wives.
Check your local cinemas’ websites for more information. 
October 31st – November 13th 

Call Of The Ocean by Freeman White

Call Of The Ocean by Freeman White

Call Of The Ocean by Freeman White

Call Of The Ocean by Freeman White

Following his sellout presentation at the 2019 Auckland Art Fair, Hawke’s Bay artist Freeman White is back, bringing his first-ever solo exhibition to Sanderson Gallery. Call of the Ocean, inspired by his The Song of the Shingle Shore, pays homage to the intense power of the ocean — encapsulating the emotive musicality of crashing waves as they hit the shoreline.
For more information, click here
On now until 10th November, Sanderson Gallery 

Jojo Rabbit

Jojo Rabbit

Jojo Rabbit

Jojo Rabbit

Written and directed by Taika Waititi and starring gifted actress-on-the-rise Thomasin McKenzie, Jojo Rabbit is very much an explosion of homegrown talent. The film, a coming-of-age styled ‘anti-hate’ satire, follows is a young, lonely German boy who discovers that his single mother is hiding a Jewish girl in their attic. His only ally is his imaginary friend, Adolf Hitler, who helps Jojo confront his blind nationalism as World War II continues to rage on.
In cinemas now

Culture


What’s the deal with ASMR? We shed some light on this fascinating sensory trend

Need a new series? Add these addictive TV shows to your watchlist this weekend

What should you read next? These 5 engrossing novels deserve a place on your bookshelf

Left it to the last minute? It’s not too late to secure your spot at these Melbourne Cup celebrations

Despite the ‘race that stops a nation’ taking place across the ditch, come November 5th Aucklanders love to don their glad rags and hold celebrations of their own in honour of the big day. As such, some of our city’s hottest dining spots are set to host their own day-at-the-races events, ensuring experiences that are just as fun-filled and glamorous as the real thing. And although many have sold out, there are still a few soirées that will have you celebrating the Melbourne Cup in style.

The Sugar Club
Free-flowing Perrier-Jouët Champagne and endless canapés are just the beginning of The Sugar Club’s day at the races.  For $195 per person, party-goers will be treated to a three-course dinner that comprises local produce and matching wines, curated by Huka Lodge’s Executive Chef, Paul Froggatt and Ora King Salmon ambassador, Chris Will.
From 4pm until 9pm
Click here for tickets and more information.

The Deck at Ostro
Combining rooftop views, live DJs, spot prizes and delicious food, Ostro is the place to be for this year’s Melbourne Cup. Each patron will receive a Big Race Pack filled with all the essentials for your online betting pleasure as well as a flute of Veuve Clicquot. And while the official lunch sold out fast, The Deck will be open, providing pours of Champagne and antipasto platters for those who are looking for a more casual experience.
From 12pm until 6pm
Click here for tickets and more information.

The Brit
Britomart’s newest pub and eatery, The Brit is making a night out of the Melbourne Cup by inviting live DJ’s, providing live coverage of the races and Stella Artois beer on tap. The full menu of delicious dishes created by Executive Chef, Gareth Stewart will be available and entry is free of charge. All you need to do is email the folks at The Brit and they will reserve you your spot. However, everyone is welcome to walk in and celebrate before, during or after the event.
From 2pm
Click
here to make your reservation

Seven at Seafarers
From 1pm, one of our favourite rooftop bars, Seven will be opening its doors for a party. A $65 ticket will get you live screenings of the races, delicious canapés and a cocktail on arrival to the boisterous and lively environment. Seven’s event will be perfect for those who are seeking a vibe that is more relaxed as opposed to the classic sit-down dining experience and is promising to extend the celebrations well into the evening.
From 1pm
Click here for tickets and more information

The Grange
North Shore locals don’t need to cross the bridge to enjoy a day at the races, thanks to The Grange in Takapuna. Enjoy the live action on the screens throughout the venue as you place your bets with the TAB packs provided. Everyone will be welcomed with a glass of Champagne and a charcuterie platter before a delicious three-course lunch is served — all for just $150 per person.
From 1pm until 6pm
Click here for tickets and more information.

Soul Bar & Bistro
Although Soul Bar & Bistro’s event is completely sold out, which comes as no surprise, our friends at Soul are keeping the bars open for anyone and everyone to enjoy as they watch the races live. Not to mention, there will also be an afterparty with music provided by DJ Vincent Hanna, so be sure to stick around.
From 4pm

Euro Bar & Restaurant
Despite Euro’s main even also having quickly sold out, there’s no need to worry as the waterfront stalwart will be welcoming everyone to join the party after the main race is over. Alongside Coley & Punch and The Culpeper, the three hospitality hotspots will be joining forces to put on a party that is not to be missed with DJ General Lee and Peter Urlich providing the tunes on the decks.

Pilkingtons
If you’re wanting to commit to a full day of celebrations, there’s no better place to do so than Pilkingtons and its bottomless long lunch. Champagne Mumm and canapés will kick off the long event that includes a two-course lunch, live coverage of the races, music by DJ Dreyfus D’Mello and best-dressed prizes.
From 1pm
Click here for tickets and more information.

Gastronomy


This new Miann opening is bringing the sweet life to Ponsonby Central

From perfect pasta to mouthwatering mezze, these are the best comfort food takeaways to order right now

Treat yourself to a Powersurge online shop, and receive a generous restaurant voucher for paying it forward
Sri Lankan Fried Noodles

This flavoursome new restaurant is serving up the ultimate Sri Lankan fare

Originally opening as a little takeaway shop on Sandringham Road in 1997, family-owned St Anthony’s Food gained fast popularity among locals for its authentic Sri Lankan fare. A popularity it has maintained now for over two decades. So, after endless requests from loyal customers to open a sit-down restaurant, the son of the St Anthony’s owner, Lakshan Peiris has opened the doors to a brand new St Anthony’s Food space in Kingsland, next door to one of our favourite pizzerias, UMU.

The first floor of the recently refurbished space (previously Grill & Shakes) showcases a cabinet that is fully stocked with St Anthony’s Food’s renowned Sandringham specialties. This includes samosas, roti wraps, sugar buns and house-baked cakes, to name a few. Up a flight of stairs there is a welcoming sit-down area where diners are able to order from the menu of authentic Sri Lankan cuisine. The whole vibe is one of relaxed sophistication, where dark timber accents meet vintage motifs and sleek, clean lines.

Fried cassava chips

On the menu, specials are set to change depending on seasonal ingredients. When we visited the special was the lump rice — a dish Peiris strongly recommends to his diners. Lump rice is a traditional Sri Lankan delicacy that sees a beautiful combination of coconut sambal, tuna, roast chicken, eggplant, onion chilli and a fried egg, wrapped into a banana leaf to keep the vibrant fragrances and aromas in tact. In St Anthony’s Food’s version, each component, despite having its own unique flavour, works in delicious harmony.

Lump rice

One of our favourite dishes, however, was the koththu which comprised a mish-mash of chopped vegetables, egg, chicken and paratha roti that had been sautéed in a delicious gravy sauce. It was unbelievably tasty, hearty and comforting and was definitely a dish that we will be returning for. For noodle fanatics, St Anthony’s Food is home to s noodle dish that is an absolute showstopper. The Sri Lankan stir-fried noodles dish comprised extremely thin noodles which were stir-fried in vegetables and eggs, and served with a side of devised chicken — a total game changer. It was packed with punchy spice and a zestiness that gave the sauce a refreshing edge and was unlike any chicken we had tried anywhere else. 

Koththu

St Anthony’s Food is also one of the rare restaurants that serves Sri Lankan hoppers. Think of these as a Sri Lankan pancake made from a mixture of fermented rice flour and coconut milk, to achieve a flavour reminiscent of sourdough but with the lightness of a French crepe. We opted for the egg hopper which paired perfectly with the devilled chicken noodles, and the treacle hopper that was sweet with strong notes of caramelised coconut sugar — the ideal dessert to conclude our Sri Lankan feast. 

Treacle hopper (on the left) and Lakshan Peiris (on the right)

It’s not every day that a Sri Lankan restaurant bursts onto Auckland’s dining scene and St Anthony’s Food is one that everybody should have on their radars. Whether you’re familiar with Sri Lankan cuisine and seeking an authentic spot to indulge, or are wanting an entirely new experience to expand your gastronomic horizons, St Anthony’s Food is guaranteed to impress. 

Opening hours:
Monday — Sunday: 8am until 9pm

St Anthony's Food

473 New North Road
Kingsland

Gastronomy


This new Miann opening is bringing the sweet life to Ponsonby Central

From perfect pasta to mouthwatering mezze, these are the best comfort food takeaways to order right now

Treat yourself to a Powersurge online shop, and receive a generous restaurant voucher for paying it forward
Ghost Donkey

Meet the restaurants and bars that are bringing a slice of New York to Auckland’s dining scene

When it comes to international dining scenes, New York’s is a well-oiled machine. With over 26,000 restaurants in the city, chefs and restaurateurs are constantly honing their craft to keep up with the competitive nature of the industry, which explains why the food offering in New York is always one step ahead. One hospitality group, in particular, that has long held court in New York’s dining scene with its line-up of award-winning restaurants and bars is AvroKO. Having announced it would be opening several outposts, including a cocktail delivery service and a modern Mexican restaurant, in Auckland’s Commercial Bay development, we have been intrigued. We recently sat down with the group’s Executive Chef Brad Farmerie to get insight on what’s to come.

Saxon + Parole
Named one of the “Best Bars in America” by Esquire magazine, the Auckland outpost of Saxon + Parole will take inspiration from its Lower Manhattan parent. Food, wine and cocktails will all be New York-centric, prepared with fresh, local ingredients that will add a distinctly New Zealand flair. The 140-seat bistro will exude a luxurious sense of sophistication yet remain inherently relaxed, like a neighbourhood eatery where comfort is the first priority.

Saxon + Parole

Ghost Donkey
Mexican cuisine is definitely underrepresented in Auckland’s dining scene. So, AvroKO’s decision to bring Ghost Donkey — a popular mezcal/ tequila bar and Mexican eatery located on Bleeker Street in NYC’s West Village — to our shores is sure to be welcomed warmly by locals. For the new outpost, Chef Farmerie has invested in a taco pressing machine, which will see all the tortillas and tacos made on-site with an in-house recipe. Complementing the Mexican menu will be an extensive selection of tequila, mezcal, cocktails and high balls. In the daytime, the frontage will transform into a takeaway taco stand before being opened up in the evening, revealing a vivacious, 80-seater space that will deliver a lively, fiesta-like experience.

Ghost Donkey

Liquorette
Last but not least is the hole-in-the-wall takeaway cocktail bar, Liquorette. Born in London, this bar was the City’s first online cocktail ordering service and is soon to bring the same revolutionary service to Auckland. And while all are invited to go to the bar and enjoy a drink in its intimate space, the mixologists at Liquorette are also giving Aucklanders the option to get their cocktails delivered to home. Accompanying the drinks, Chef Farmerie is currently working on designing a pizza menu which, if London’s Liquorette pizzas are anything to go by, are set to be delicious.

Liquorette

Gastronomy


This new Miann opening is bringing the sweet life to Ponsonby Central

From perfect pasta to mouthwatering mezze, these are the best comfort food takeaways to order right now

Treat yourself to a Powersurge online shop, and receive a generous restaurant voucher for paying it forward

We talk to the creators behind H&M’s new Giambattista Valli collab

H&M’s designer capsule collections have proven a successful venture for the brand since they started with Karl Lagerfeld in 2004. Since then, H&M has worked alongside some of the biggest names in fashion to bring its customers collections that capture the high-fashion essence of the label in question while still embodying the high-street ideals that H&M has built its reputation on. This year, Italian powerhouse Giambattista Valli was the designer chosen as H&M’s collaborative partner, resulting in a stunning collection that both evokes Valli’s signature couture style while still feeling true to H&M. We spoke with both Giambattista Valli himself and H&M’s Creative Advisor, Ann-Sofie Johansson, to ask about the inspiration and process behind the impressive collection.

Left: Ann-Sofie Johansson, Kendall Jenner and Giambattista Valli

Giambattista Valli:
What was the design process like for this collection? Did you have to change your usual approach or look elsewhere for inspiration?
The design process was certainly very different – with H&M being so industrial, the fabrics and the techniques have been adapted to a lower price point. But the creative process behind it – from conception to execution – was in no way different from when I sit down at my desk with a blank piece of paper in front of me. After that moment of introspection, I start sketching. What comes after is just about careful selection of the best ingredients to make what I had imagined turn into reality. This time was no different with the exception that I knew I would have the H&M customer joining my other clients. What I was adamant about it that like any of my collections the whole collaboration had to be executed with perfection in mind and the details of each piece is proven in the results. 

Giambattista Valli has become synonymous with uber-feminine shapes and couture finishes — how did you fit these high fashion ideals into a more high street framework?
For both women’s and men’s, I handpicked different signature Giambattista Valli elements, such as key silhouettes, plissée tulle, crystal and flower embroideries to be reinterpreted for the H&M customer. The collection conveys the “esprit” of Giambattista Valli but has been produced with techniques that could accommodate the needs of such a wider audience – for women and for the launch my very first men’s collection ever, which is inspired by the eclecticism and global youth culture but infused with the Valli DNA. 

This collab also marked your first foray into menswear — what were the most challenging aspects of designing for men? 
I do not distinguish pieces between womenswear or menswear, I rather designed this collection for customers regardless of gender. When I create a piece, it is about the character who wears it, their personality and their own distinguished style and culture, and how my design could embrace these. So regardless of womenswear or menswear, it finally comes down to these core elements of an individual. 

What kind of woman/man do you envisage wearing pieces from this collaboration?
The Valli Girls and Valli Boys are very independent. They don’t follow any trends and they’re very nomadic in their sense of style. They are very eclectic. The Valli People adapt to any situation in such a beautiful way because they are comfortable with themselves.

Which pieces are your picks to be the most popular and why?
I love every single piece of the collection. To me, they feel like unique collector pieces rather than throw-away garments produced based on trends. They are timeless and meant to be kept in one’s wardrobe, to mix and match to the customer’s personal style, embracing their personality. I truly treasure the span of offering and the variety of pieces from this collection: from street and daywear to evening and party looks, customers can enjoy the world of Giambattista Valli. I am also very proud of having approached menswear for the first time with this collaboration, although I always design for characters, regardless of their gender. Freedom of expression is the ultimate luxury, not the value of the price tag! 

Ann-Sofie Johannson:
H&M has undertaken a number of designer collaborations over the last few years… Why did you feel Giambattista Valli was the right fit for this year’s collection? 
We chose Giambattista Valli for this year’s H&M designer collaboration because he is the undisputed master of couture with an amazing ability to create strong silhouettes, and both H&M and Giambattista himself wanted to share that with our customers around the world. We were also drawn to how he speaks to the modern woman and man as much as the craftsmanship and beauty of his designs, which you’ll be able to see throughout the collection. 

What were the biggest challenges in producing this collection? Were there any particularly difficult pieces to make?
The main challenge was probably getting the same effect of a couture piece, but we were all really pleased even when the first samples arrived. Authenticity is very important to Giambattista and this H&M collaboration is a very honest representation of the Giambattista Valli couture dream. The most rewarding is the fact that we both wanted to express this idea of timeless beauty that is part of the Giambattista Valli DNA, pieces that customers will have in their wardrobes for a long time, some even becoming collector pieces, and I think we’ve succeeded!

How did the collaborative process work here? I.e. how much input or influence did you have in the final designs? 
We generally give “free reins” to the designers for the collaborations, but the H&M team also work closely with them, bouncing ideas off each other, sharing sketches, looking over the samples and so on. This year, in close collaboration with the H&M team, Giambattista Valli has created a collection that is an eclectic recap of his signature styles with pieces designed to last and be loved over time. They are beautiful and well-crafted – spanning both womenswear and menswear – but also effortless and timeless. There’s a wonderful high-low mix of partywear, for example, and more streetwear-inspired garments, which ultimately act as a full wardrobe for different occasions. 

How do you think the collection will be received by the H&M customer?
I very much hope with utmost enthusiasm and happiness! Giambattista has always said that his goal with the collaboration was to make the most number people around the world happy and we definitely share that sentiment. But we also want customers to wear the collection, mix it with their own wardrobes and cherish them for a long time.

What are your favourite pieces from the collection?
It’s always hard to choose, but my heart does beat a little faster for the maxi-length black floral tulle dress with the jewelled neckline, ruffled details and poet sleeves. I also love the black lace A-line dress with short sleeves, floral embroidery and ruffle hem, and the combination of the red leather trousers and red ruffled silk blouse is just absolutely stunning.

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Heirloom Tomato Salad
Copia
Brik Pastry

Orakei Bay Village welcomes Copia, a delicious new eatery serving sustainable cuisine

Orakei Bay Village is continuing to grow, with recent openings including Moustache Cookies and a luxurious boutique cinema, Silky Otter. Now, a brand new eatery has landed in the village, situated down the long flight of stairs (past Plant Barn) and boasting views out to Hobson Bay. Meet Copia, a warm and welcoming eatery serving delicious bites with a sustainable bent.

Owned and operated by chefs, Ken O’Connell and Sam Sykes, Copia showcases high-quality ingredients in an approachable and delicious way, keeping sustainability at the heart of its offering. O’Connell and Sykes focus on the origins of all their ingredients, ensuring most can be traced back to either the greenhouse or gardens on site. This also means that the menu will change according to the season, which not only puts freshness at the forefront but also shines a light on nature’s bounty.

Black pudding and sweetbreads

On the menu, the produce is the hero, which means that rather than complex dishes, the offering is simple but perfectly executed. The heirloom tomato salad, for example, saw tomatoes paired beautifully with spring onion mousse and a sprinkle of melt-in-your-mouth coppa (a type of cured meat). Elsewhere on the menu, O’Connell had drawn from his Irish roots to create modern versions of traditional Irish delicacies. The black pudding, for instance, served with juicy sweetbreads and spiced yakon tasted like pickled vegetables and was served with a side of creamy rosemary aioli which cut through its prominent salty flavours.

Paua and squid croquettes

Another standout dish was the paua and squid croquettes. Inspired by the classic Kiwi paua fritter, O’Connell and Sykes combined the seafood with squid and potatoes, turning it into a crispy croquette (and a dish not to be missed).

Our favourite dish, however, was the wagyu beef bavette. The succulent meat was cooked perfectly, laid over a bed of cavolo nero and drenched in horseradish butter. But the game-changer was the bone marrow crumb — a highly-addictive, utterly delicious addition that left us wanting more.

Wagyu beef bavette

Last but definitely not least was dessert, which channelled some serious Kiwi nostalgia. Our pick from the dessert menu was called the Chocolate Delice, and comprised rhubarb ice cream, cherry gel and caramelised white chocolate. It reminded us of the iconic Jelly Tip ice cream, which was later confirmed by the chefs as a major inspiration.

Chocolate delice

Open for both lunch and dinner, Copia is an ideal spot for any occasion, from a casual lunch to a romantic date night and we’re predicting this eatery will fast become a neighbourhood favourite.

Opening hours:
Wednesday — Saturday: 11:30am until 3pm and 5:30pm until 9pm
Sunday: 11am until 6pm
Monday & Tuesday: Closed

Copia

236 Orakei Road
Remuera

09 520 2234

www.copia.nz

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