Meet Lulu’s, Ponsonby Central’s new plant-based soft-serve and acai bowl window

The newest addition Ponsonby Central is inviting us to indulge in something sweet and feel good about it in the process. Newly-opened Lulu’s is a charming spot dedicated to plant-based soft serve and nutrient-packed acai bowls, and marks an evolution from the brand’s cult-followed, food truck beginnings. Here, flavour and sustainability come together in harmony, and there are already people lining up to get a taste of the magic for themselves.

You’ll find Lulu’s tucked in the laneway by Silky Otter, a hidden gem waiting to be discovered. It’s the brainchild of Lula and Tyla Samuel, a mother-daughter team inspired by the latter’s travels across Europe, Indonesia and Australia. Having noticed a gap in the market, they decided to bring delicious, plant-based soft-serve ice cream and Brazilian acai bowls to our city in new and innovative ways. And so far, it seems the venture is paying off.

The hero at Lulu’s is its coconut-based soft serve, a treat that tastes as good as it looks. The flavours are mesmerisingly swirled together to create flavour combinations that are delicious and undeniably photogenic. Instagram-friendly, if you will. The most popular flavour, we’re told, is the mango soft serve. Reminiscent of both the tropical vacation we crave and the sorely-missed Fruju Tropical Snow, it’s easy to see why this iteration has become so sought-after.

In addition, Lulu’s Ponsonby also serves incredible acai bowls. But instead of blending everything together like many other places, the team here hand-scoops the ingredients, which results in a delightfully creamy texture. The bowls are topped with seasonal fruits and superfoods, turning them from a tasty treat to a healthy indulgence.

Before finding this permanent Ponsonby home, Lulu’s operated from a food truck for four years. And while the duo behind Lulu’s loved being on the go, they found that the weather sometimes got in the way of their events, and it soon became clear it was time to lay down more permanent roots. That’s why they were thrilled when they found the perfect little shop window in the heart of a humming hospitality hub. It was the opportunity they had been waiting for.

The Samuels have big dreams for Lulu’s. They hope to keep expanding the menu and even open a second location one day. With their dedication to solely plant-based cuisine and their commitment to deliciousness, there’s no doubt that Lulu’s will continue to grow and gather more foodie fans along the way.

Lulu's

8 Brown Street,
Ponsonby, Auckland

www.instagram.com/lulus.nz

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Gastronomy

Andiamo’s new set menu is a delicious celebration of autumn
Taking over a coveted spot in Parnell, meet Rhu — the elevated new all-day eatery from an ex-Pasture chef
Raise a glass to rosé as Soul Bar & Bistro launches a month-long celebration of this delicious drop

East Day Spa unveils its new heat-therapy zones

In the wellbeing realm, where the pursuit of ultimate indulgence is neverending, East Day Spa has long been a leader of the pack and a beacon of constant innovation. Recently, its flagship location, an oasis-like spa in the heart of Auckland’s CBD, has undergone a breathtaking metamorphosis. Reflective of the East Day Spa team’s unwavering commitment to redefining the essence of the spa experience, the refurbished space now radiates an aura of opulence and serenity that is simply unrivalled, and boasts a series of new spaces in which clients can find relaxation and rejuvenation on a whole other level.

The new interior of East Day Spa has been carefully designed to create a contemporary haven of calm. Curved accents and luxurious materials combine harmoniously, allowing visitors to escape their busy, daily lives to a world of tranquillity and peace. The spa now boasts state-of-the-art facilities and treatments catering to every wellness need, including a highly-anticipated Tepidarium and Sauna Space.

East Day Spa Sauna

The Tepidarium is a purpose-built warm relaxation room that almost oozes bliss. Five Italian stone-heated loungers emit a radiant, gentle heat, designed to gently melt away muscle tension and encourage the mind to unwind. It is the perfect space to surrender your body to complete relaxation, whether before or after a treatment or simply as a peaceful vacation from the outside world. Sessions in the East Tepidarium can be enjoyed for as little as 30 minutes, accommodating a maximum of five people per session for an intimate and exclusive experience.

For those seeking heat therapy on a deeper level, East Day Spa now also offers a new range of Clearlight Infrared Saunas. These sublime spaces provide a personal sanctuary where clients can bask in warmth and comfort. The healing infrared light penetrates the body, removing toxins, relieving muscle pain, boosting metabolism, alleviating joint stiffness, improving skin health, and even diminishing the appearance of cellulite. Whether you enjoy this serene space alone or with a friend, the new saunas promise a transformative experience.

East Day Spa Sauna

Founded in 2002, East Day Spa has locations in Auckland, Wellington and Bali. The team’s dedication to exceeding guests’ expectations is evident in the spas’ extensive treatment menus, offering more than 70 options that encompass both Eastern remedies and cutting-edge European skincare — this latest foray into heat therapy is just one example. 

Really, there’s no better opportunity to escape the stresses of daily life than with East Day Spa’s newly unveiled Tepidarium and Sauna Space. Here, you can surrender to complete relaxation, rejuvenate your body and emerge feeling entirely refreshed and ready to take on anything.

COMPETITION IS NOW CLOSED

Full terms and conditions here.

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Wellbeing

Auckland’s newest reformer studio offers group classes, private sessions, and the perfect place to practice
Embrace the sleek sophistication of Photo Finish Hair — the tress trend of the moment
Three simple ways to achieve a sharp jawline and a snatched profile

Secure your spot at MoVida’s very first ‘Paella & Pincho Saturdays’, hosted by Frank Camorra himself

Since opening, MoVida has delighted discerning Auckland diners with its mouthwatering menu, bringing a touch of exquisite, Spanish cuisine to the City of Sails. From flavoursome tapas to larger sharing dishes that serve tender meat and satiating seafood to sides and desserts that round out any meal perfectly, MoVida’s cult-followed culinary philosophy has made a significant impact on the dining scene here, and for very good reason.

Movida Tapas

Now, the acclaimed destination is launching a special, ticketed dining series, and is bringing none other than MoVida’s Founder, Frank Camorra, over from Melbourne to kick the very first iteration off with a bang. The inaugural ‘Paella and Pincho Saturdays’ is set to take place on Saturday the 17th of June, and will comprise a series of fun, foodie delights including a showcase of over 15 of MoVida’s most popular pincho and tapas, followed by Camorra’s famous Seafood Paella and other tasty treats from Basque Country and beyond, all served alongside a selection of delectable Spanish wines and sherries.

Movida Paella

Tickets for this unmissable event are on sale now and are set to be very popular, so we suggest you get in quickly. Beyond this specific event, ‘Paella & Pincho Saturdays’ will continue throughout the rest of the year, with MoVida promising to put on a delicious spread every Saturday from the 24th of June, with paella and pincho served up from midday to 4pm — the perfect way to while away a weekend afternoon with flavoursome food, great drinks and excellent company.

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Gastronomy

Andiamo’s new set menu is a delicious celebration of autumn
Taking over a coveted spot in Parnell, meet Rhu — the elevated new all-day eatery from an ex-Pasture chef
Raise a glass to rosé as Soul Bar & Bistro launches a month-long celebration of this delicious drop

One of our favourite waterfront spots has opened for after-work drinks and weekend wines

Considering that there’s nothing like marking the end of a long day (or week) with fine wine, delicious cheese and satiating nibbles (even better when they’re enjoyed with friends), we were so excited when we heard that Park Hyatt’s The Pantry has decided to evolve its delectable offering to include an evening service. The waterfront spot recently unveiled its new ‘Evening Eats’ menu to coincide with the extension of its opening hours, now open until 9pm on Wednesday through Sunday. In doing so, this expansive corner spot has staked its claim as the perfect place for discerning business people and locals alike to unwind over wine and charcuterie and is giving us all the excuse we need to head towards the water when the work day is done.

The Pantry

On the new menu, cheeses and charcuterie are the heroes, with the former comprising a series of fresh, daily varietals served with crackers and quince, and the latter made up of prosciutto, classic salami or hot soppressata, served with grain mustard and pickles.

That said if it’s something more satiating you seek, there is also a selection of flavoursome bites that have been designed to pair perfectly with The Pantry’s wine list. From Gruyere Grilled Cheese with horseradish and caramelised onions, and Prawn Toast with brioche, miso mayo, sweet soy and bonito flakes, to ‘PFC’ or Pantry Fried Chicken and Crispy Potatoes with onion dip and manchego cheese, to a particularly tasty-looking Kung Pao Brussels Sprouts, the ‘Evening Eats’ menu is full of easy, indulgent dishes that are sure to satisfy any craving.

So next time you’re thinking about an after-work drink, or indeed are planning a weekend catch-up with friends, Park Hyatt’s The Pantry is the place to go. And while walk-ins are welcome, we recommend booking this popular spot by emailing here or calling (09) 366 1234, if you’re to secure the best table.

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Gastronomy

Andiamo’s new set menu is a delicious celebration of autumn
Taking over a coveted spot in Parnell, meet Rhu — the elevated new all-day eatery from an ex-Pasture chef
Raise a glass to rosé as Soul Bar & Bistro launches a month-long celebration of this delicious drop

In honour of Succession’s final episode — 20 of the best and most brutal one-liners from every season of the cult-favourite show

Succession, the show that for four seasons has kept us enthralled, entertained and on the edge of our seats, is finally coming to an end (the long-awaited Succession finale is on tonight). And while we won’t spoil the storyline for anyone who hasn’t watched the series yet (although why you haven’t is beyond us) we have decided to round up a few of the most outrageous, most humorous and most brutal one-liners from across Succession‘s four seasons. What better way to honour the show that has been deemed one of HBO’s best-written to date?

From the ‘ludicrously capacious bag’ to ‘you can’t make a Tomelette without breaking some Gregs’, here are 20 memorable one-liners from Succession that prove why this show will go down in history.

“Are we talking to each other on the deck of a majestic schooner? Is the salty brine stinging my weather-beaten face? No? Then why the f**k are you wearing a pair of deck shoes man?” — Tom Wambsgans, Season One

“It was supposed to be choreographed. That was about as choreographed as a dog getting f****d on roller skates.” — Logan Roy, Season Two

Succession Best Quotes

“You can’t make a Tomelette without breaking some Gregs.” — Tom Wamsgans (as read by Gil Eavis), Season Two

“My mum’s getting remarried to a bowl of porridge.” — Roman Roy, Season Three

“She’s brought a ludicrously capacious bag. What’s even in there? Flat shoes for the subway? Her lunch pail?” — Tom Wambsgans, Season Four

“I was wondering, just, in your view do you think it’s possible to sue a person, a grandparent for example, in a way which is like… like in an affectionate way? That might convey, like, ‘I love you and I’m glad you’re a part of my life, but I am taking legal action against you’?” — Greg Hirsch, Season Three

Succession Best Quotes

“You don’t hear much about syphilis these days. Very much the MySpace of STDs.” — Tom Wambsgans, Season Two

“What I think he meant to say was that he wished that mum gave birth to a can opener, because at least then it would be useful.” — Roman Roy, Season One

“She’s one of the hard b**ches, right? She’s going to do 36 hours of maternity leave, emailing through her vanity caesarean.” — Shiv Roy, Season Four

“’The ‘Logan Roy School of Journalism’? What’s next, the ‘Jack The Ripper Women’s Health Clinic’?” — Ewan Roy, Season Two

“It’s like Jaws. If everyone in Jaws worked for Jaws.” — Greg Hirsch, Season Four

Succession Best Quotes

“What’s that, ‘Date Rape’ by Calvin Klein?” — Shiv Roy, Season One

“Hey hey hey, it’s the Grim Weeper. Tiny tears.” — Jaryd Mencken, Season Four

“Someone could fit through that window. A small person. An attack child.” — Greg Hirsch, Season Two

“Organise a little coup down in old Peru? Put me in a van to Tajikistan? Couldn’t I just be our fun guy in Uruguay?” — Connor Roy, Season Four

“I’m about to take a s**t in your husband’s mouth and I’m pretty sure he’s going to tell me it tastes like coq au vin .” — Lukas Matsson, Season Four

“He occasionally has expressed a distaste in the past for my particular flavour of me.” — Greg Hirsch, Season Four

Succession Best Quotes

“If a deal collapses in a wood and no one hears it, is it an SEC violation?” — Roman Roy, Season Four

“So sue me — my lawyer used to work for the justice department, who’s your lawyer? Mr F***ing Magoo?” — Logan Roy, Season Two

“F**k off.” — Logan Roy

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Culture

We’re on the hunt for an experienced full-time writer
Voices of Hope’s new audio-visual exhibition is an illuminating exploration of mental health in New Zealand
With new owners and a new venue, the highly-anticipated Aotearoa Art Fair is back & better than ever for 2024
Left: Lobster Agnolotti with Tor Sauce. Right: Yukkaejang Pappardelle.

Less than six months after opening in Ponsonby, Aigo unveils a second outpost in Newmarket — and we have your exclusive first look

Auckland is now well-versed in Aigo’s excellence. The moments when this Ponsonby Road restaurant isn’t heaving are rare, and just days after opening last November, it had become one of the hardest-to-come-by tables in town. Its initial, unprecedented success was the catalyst for this week’s opening of Aigo Newmarket, which sees a return for restauranteur David Lee to his hospitality roots. Here, one half of The Candy Shop has been reclaimed as Aigo, in a continuation of Lee’s vision to offer delicious Korean-inspired food in all its forms.

Applying the same approach Lee used when fitting out Dear Jervois all the way back in 2013, he quite literally designed the space himself, employing friends to help with the gruntier parts of the build. Attention to detail here is evident — all the light features and lampshades were picked by him, even where they were placed around the space. With his team in tow, Lee has spent the past months hunting through antique stores, finding what could possibly work in the space, staying late every night and testing out their finds. A masterclass in trial and error, if you will, but one that has ultimately paid off — and speaks to his approach for Aigo Newmarket more broadly.

Aigo Interiors by David Lee
Aigo Newmarket interiors designed by David Lee.

We’ve come to learn that despite their shared moniker and overarching principles, these two destinations diverge slightly in their menu. With a spacious and expanded kitchen, the new Aigo moves past the boundaries of noodle dishes that defined its predecessor, offering an enticing evolution of flavours. From what we’ve been told, dishes you need to order include the likes of pancetta rose tteokbokki, an indulgent combination of a subtly spicy gochujang cream sauce paired with the iconic chewy rice cake noodles (like the cacio e pepe version from Ponsonby). And then there’s the truly authentic yukgaejang ragu, which pays homage to the fiery and beloved Korean staple soup. Here the kitchen skillfully distils the essence of this soup into a rich ragu, infused with wagyu mince and served alongside homemade pappardelle.

Some of Ponsonby’s hero dishes, like the crispy rice with spicy tuna tartare, the crispy eggplant and the bibim naengmyeon, will remain across both venues (all three of which I ate and loved at Aigo Ponsonby last week), speaking to the rapture that Lee and Head Chef Kevin Choi’s menu already has the City in. Much of the drinks menu will remain the same too; with an extensive list of natural wines sourced from the Aigo team’s friends at Wine Diamonds, and a few crafty (and some more mainstream) beers for good measure. A delicious, classic cocktail list can be relied upon too, with a few fun concoctions in the mix.

Similarities aside, Lee explains to me how the development of his first site was somewhat of a call and response to the changing nature of the space — only pivoting from a fried chicken shop to the now-adored noodle bar at the last minute. “You could say it was a bit rushed,” he recalls. “Working with the little kitchen space we had, and I’m thankful to my team for pulling it off.” He tells me that with this sister restaurant, having ample time and space (Newmarket seats 60 diners at any one time) has led to this more evolved, grown-up version of Aigo. “We’ve had a lot more time to prepare, and we made the kitchen a lot bigger so we can do the things we’ve always wanted to do. We can now do handmade pasta and a lot more chargrilled meats — I’m looking forward to seeing how our friends in Newmarket respond to these flavours.”

Aigo Newmarket
Left: Rose Tteokbokki. Right: Natural Wines from Wine Diamonds.

Those in his inner-most circle describe it as part of the next era of Newmarket dining; the much-needed injection into the suburb’s late-night dining scene. Knowing that it takes a village, Lee has decided to open The Candy Shop for dinner as well. This means Osborne Lane will be lively during the late hours, with its neighbour Duck Island being open at night too, drawing more people into the area.

Through the newly-founded Namu Group, which incorporates Lee’s varied suite of venues, from Camper Coffee to Pōni, his legacy is already becoming a constant evolution of excellence. One that pays homage to authentic Korean roots and still looks ahead to all of the influences that can elevate his restaurants to the next level. If anything, Aigo’s success thus far proves exactly that.

Opening Hours:
Wednesday — Sunday, 5pm until late

Aigo Newmarket

2-8 Osborne Street, Newmarket

www.namugroup.co.nz/venue/aigo-newmarket

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Gastronomy

Andiamo’s new set menu is a delicious celebration of autumn
Taking over a coveted spot in Parnell, meet Rhu — the elevated new all-day eatery from an ex-Pasture chef
Raise a glass to rosé as Soul Bar & Bistro launches a month-long celebration of this delicious drop
Sunday Service

With a new private dining room and new Sunday hours, Bar Magda should be your next booking

Nestled just behind bustling Karangahape Road, Bar Magda has long been synonymous with culinary mastery, providing a cosy ambience that transports guests away from the busy city streets. Its intimate setting coupled with its unique menu that explores Aotearoa’s seasonal produce through a Filipino lens has made Bar Magda one of our favourite dining destinations, and with a number of new offerings on the table, the experience here has just become a whole lot better.

Recently, Bar Magda opened the doors of its exclusive new private dining room, a sanctuary of elegance capable of accommodating up to 25 seated guests (or if extended into the bistro, 50-60 guests, depending on the type of event). Thoughtfully and comfortably furnished, this secluded enclave is the perfect choice for corporate soirées or special celebrations like birthdays, where guests can enjoy Bar Magda’s impeccable service and indulge in the finest cuisine, knowing that every detail has been meticulously curated to to meet expectations.

Bar Magda Private Dining
Private Dining Room

Alongside the exclusivity of the new private dining room, Bar Magda also offers a range of versatile spaces for larger gatherings. The bar dining area, for instance, exudes an atmosphere of semi-private intimacy and comfortably fits up to 30 guests for a seated dinner. Meanwhile, the bar drinking area is ideal for casual drinks and delectable snacks and can accommodate up to 45 guests for a standing cocktail party. Combined, these spaces can host up to 60 guests, ensuring a delightful balance between elegance, exclusivity and conviviality. That said, Bar Magda can also be booked in its entirety for a seated dinner of 70-75 people, or for a stand-up cocktail party of around 100.

Of course, larger groups of 10 to 20 can still book big tables at Bar Magda (perfect for events that don’t require an entirely private space) for which they can choose between the restaurant’s $60-per-person or $85-per-person set menus (with the latter affording any large group use of their table for the whole night as opposed to the standard, two-hour service).

Bar Magda Private Dining
Private Dining Room

When it comes to the food, Bar Magda unsurprisingly shines. Here, the large-format sharing menu, priced at $85 per person, promises a tantalising journey for the senses, with the centrepiece being a whole, bone-in lamb shoulder, finished over coals and expertly deboned tableside to add dramatic flair to the whole delicious affair.

That said, for an additional $5 per person, guests could be treated to a cherished family recipe instead, originally created by the grandmother of Bar Magda’s Founder, Carlo Buenaventura. This alternative main is a whole, boneless chicken relleno, stuffed with succulent pork and duck embutido. For a truly festive affair (and for only $15 more per person) guests can opt for both the lamb shoulder and the chicken.

Bar Magda Sunday Service
Sunday Service

Alongside the new private space, Bar Magda is also now opening its doors every Sunday, allowing patrons to experience its extraordinary offering throughout the weekend. The new Sunday hours come with a couple of exciting new offerings, too. As a special treat, guests can delight in a glass of Andre Clouet Champagne paired with a two-course sharing menu for $70 per person. Additionally, oenophiles and connoisseurs are invited to bring their own prized bottles of wine to enjoy alongside their meals, paying standard corkage fees. This unique Sunday offering allows guests to indulge in an intimate setting while savouring cherished wines and creating special memories.

The arrival of Sunday hours does, however, mean that Bar Magda will close its Tuesday service, ensuring that their team can continue to offer culinary excellence and impeccable service on the days that they are open.

So, whether it’s an intimate gathering in the private dining room, a corporate affair in one of the versatile spaces, or a leisurely Sunday experience, Bar Magda will transport its diners to another world. From its exceptional cuisine to its intimate setting to its meticulous attention to detail, Bar Magda is truly a hidden gem in Auckland’s dining scene and continues to exceed expectations, every time.

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Gastronomy

Andiamo’s new set menu is a delicious celebration of autumn
Taking over a coveted spot in Parnell, meet Rhu — the elevated new all-day eatery from an ex-Pasture chef
Raise a glass to rosé as Soul Bar & Bistro launches a month-long celebration of this delicious drop
From left: Loro Piana Fall 23, Christian Dior Fall 23, Brunello Cucinelli Fall 23

We explore the rising volume of ‘quiet luxury’ and ask: should we be buying into fashion’s biggest buzzword?

Whether you’re a Succession devotee or not, you’ll likely be familiar with central character, Tom Wambsgans’, reaction to a handbag in the first episode of the show’s fourth (and final) season.

“…She’s brought a ludicrously capacious bag,” he says. “What’s even in there? Huh? Flat shoes for the subway? Her lunch pail? I mean, Greg, it’s monstrous. It’s gargantuan. You could take it camping. You could slide it across the floor after a bank job.”

It was a cultural moment, mostly because it spoke to something far more significant than the show itself (popular as it may be). It underlined the paradigm shift happening in the world of luxury right now, one in which the logomania of yesteryear has been usurped by the idea of ‘quiet luxury,’ as ‘billionaire bore-core’ or ‘stealth wealth’ becomes fashion’s new direction. 

The rise of this movement has drawn widespread discourse. Sparked by luxury brands’ recent deviation from overt logos, furthered by Succession’s carefully-curated character looks and thrust into the mainstream by the meticulous outfits Gwyneth Paltrow wore in her now-iconic ski trial, quiet luxury is as pervasive and as influential as ‘normcore’ was in the 2010s. But what is it actually? 

At its heart, quiet luxury does what it says on the label. It is fashion that whispers about its wearer’s deep pockets, so deep that they are able to pay $1500 for a plain polo shirt with no distinct markings whatsoever. (Or in Paltrow’s case, $1690 for a merino sweater from The Row.) So deep, in fact, that their entire wardrobe consists of simple, understated pieces that (to the untrained eye) could have come from anywhere, but that require at least a four-figure investment. In a way, it emphasises fashion’s unsung heroes, putting our foundational staples at the forefront by reimagining them in premium fabrics, simple colours and elegant silhouettes (which actually gives the trend a sustainable edge if you subscribe to the principle of ‘buy once, buy right’). It is undeniably subtle, inherently timeless and completely out of reach for most, with the point being to only confirm one’s personal wealth to those ‘in the know.’ 

From left: Sarah Snook in the fourth season of Succession. Gwyneth Paltrow leaving court.

Brands like The Row, Zegna, Chloe and Jil Sander are obvious examples, but quiet luxury has recently permeated the runways of Christian Dior, Prada, Miu Miu, Saint Laurent and even Gucci and Louis Vuitton, which marks a distinct about-face for the last two, who, until recently, had made headlines for collections that were eccentric, head-turning and covered in logos. And with the way things are going, we expect that a number of other brands will follow suit soon, as quiet luxury is forecast as the most significant aesthetic shift of the year. 

Vogue defined quiet luxury as “…less austere than minimalism but more polished than ‘normcore,’ while Elle magazine dubbed it the “new age minimalism.” And as Leandra Medine articulated in a recent post on her Substack The Cereal Aisle, “…most of the defining attributes of ‘QL’ refer to the quality of the material, the palette of neutral colours, and the overall emphasis on basic silhouettes, reflecting a low-key approach to getting dressed…” She continues, “…but I think the defining element of quiet luxury… relates more to the focus on its resemblance to an aesthetic most commonly perpetrated by the ‘old money’ archetype.” 

This last part is interesting. The connection between quiet luxury and old money is obvious, and both have enjoyed almost parallel ascents to pop-culture popularity. In fact, research has shown that online searches for ‘old money,’ ‘stealth wealth’ and ‘quiet luxury’ have skyrocketed 300-500 percent in the last few months, while the ‘old money aesthetic’ has been recently trending among TikTok’s Gen Z tastemakers, with many seeking to emulate the trope despite not having the disposable income to do so properly. (The idea is being able to find dupes thanks to the trend’s understated playbook). And while that works to a degree, quiet luxury is meant to only communicate the status of its wearer via expertly-crafted cuts, heritage prints, sumptuous materials and a penchant for neutrality which, most of the time, is only obvious to those who can decipher the code. Those who can, for instance, distinguish a simple Loro Piana sweater from a Zara one, or can tell the difference between Mark Zuckerberg’s $500 custom Brunello Cucinelli T-shirts and the almost-identical H&M versions. After all, the true definition of luxury is (and always has been) fluid; only really understood in its relation to the uber- wealthy. Ultimately, it is they who set the terms, and only they who can change the rules. (Usually when something has become too mainstream.)

From left: Gucci Fall 23, Louis Vuitton Fall 23, Prada Fall 23, Loewe Fall 23.

Perhaps the romanticism of ‘old money’ is also a reaction to the global economy; where people would rather live in the fantasy of being born into the kind of privilege that virtually no one else (save a few savvy individuals) can earn by working hard. A world in which the threat of recession or inflation has little impact; a world in which one is so secure in their wealth that exclusivity is based on the intrinsic value of a product and not on any external markers.

The idea of anonymity also plays a huge role here. Quiet luxury touches on our collective desire to fly under the radar, understandable at a time when almost everything about us is out there for general consumption. There is something deeply appealing about using fashion to communicate restraint, privacy and the luxury of keeping a few things close to our chests. Of course, the underlying irony here is that the discourse around quiet luxury has left most questioning how ‘quiet’ it really is anymore. I would go so far as to say that we have turned up the dial on this trend so much that the word ‘quiet’ doesn’t really fit. Furthermore, if we’re honest with ourselves, the idea of being incognito (truly incognito) is nothing more than a romanticised myth; something from a bygone era on which we look back with wistful nostalgia. In reality, many who now are adopting quiet luxury are doing so because of its trending status, and not because they want to be quiet about it at all. I’ve even seen commentary recently on the fact that fast-fashion brands like Shein are jumping on the bandwagon (which could very well signal the beginning of the end). 

“At its heart, ‘quiet luxury’ does what it says on the label. It is fashion that whispers about its wearer’s deep pockets, so deep that they are able to pay $1500 for a plain polo shirt with no distinct markings whatsoever.” 

There are already indications that the fashion cognoscenti are tiring of this trend. In a recent article for The Cut, 032c magazine’s Editor, Brenda Weischer pointed to the way in which the youth’s obsession with quiet luxury is at odds with their ‘eat the rich’ ethos, and questions why anyone should care about blending in with the style of “CEO Boomers,” who she describes as “predominantly white men who are afraid of fashion due to their own internalised toxic masculinity.” She also (rightly) says, “the stylists of Succession are doing a very accurate job; however, how is it lost on the audience that these characters are absolute miserable losers?” The article ends on this: “Enough with quiet luxury. If we can’t attain it, why not embrace being loud?” 

Wherever you fall in the discourse around this trend, quiet luxury is, at its heart, a back-to-basics approach to fashion. There is something to be said for the way in which all of this debate around its nature and importance takes something away from the inherent concept. You don’t have to have eye-wateringly deep pockets to buy once and buy well. A sustainable, chic wardrobe of investment pieces can be built slowly, with patience, and it will last you a lifetime. That, and not its ability to signpost wealth, is what we should try to take from the rise of quiet luxury. And if you would rather stick to your high-octane, head-turning, logo-adorned looks — do. Wear the ludicrously capacious bag, for goodness sake. Quiet luxury is louder than its name suggests, so maybe, actually turning up the volume is the subversive shift we need.

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Coveted

An iconic brand for over 40 years, Pomellato should be in everyone’s jewellery collections — here, we talk to Sarah Hutchings of Orsini about why
Fresh off the runways of Milan Fashion Week — our favourite ready-to-wear looks from Fall 2024
Fresh from London Fashion Week — the best looks from the Fall 2024 runways so far

Do you know the difference between dehydrated and dry skin? One beauty expert shares her seasonal protocol for both

When elevating skin to its healthiest state, understanding the nuances of skincare and all its jargon is paramount. One common source of confusion is the difference between dehydration and dry skin. These two terms may seem interchangeable, but understanding their distinctions is necessary if you are to address your skin’s concerns effectively. Recently, I spoke with Gina Turner, a renowned skin expert from Sothys who shared invaluable insight on the matter, explaining which treatment rituals were best for addressing both conditions. Sothys, a brand synonymous with luxury and efficacy, has been at the forefront of skincare innovation for decades, making Turner the perfect person to point us (and our skin) in the right direction.

Dehydration, as Turner explains, refers to a lack of water in the skin, while dryness signifies an absence of oil. While the two conditions may manifest with similar symptoms, discerning their underlying causes is essential for accurate treatment. Dehydration often leaves the skin feeling tight, particularly after cleansing, as if your skin is one size too small for your face. On the other hand, dryness is characterised by rough texture, flaking, dullness and occasional sensitivity. Observing these manifestations carefully will allow you to begin the most suitable protocol to support your skin through the season.

You see, as the seasons change, our skin faces different challenges. Winter, in particular, exacerbates both dehydration and dryness. The harsh cold air and temperature fluctuations from indoor heating strip the skin of its moisture, leaving it vulnerable to these conditions. In such climates, it becomes crucial to employ a regimen that counteracts these effects and restores balance to the skin.

When it comes to treating dehydration, Turner emphasises the efficacy of topical applications. The right moisturiser, specifically formulated to support water flow and retention in the skin, can provide instant relief to a parched visage. Look for products containing keywords such as hydrate and plump, as they focus on restoring and maintaining optimal hydration levels.

Addressing dryness, Turner suggests a multifaceted approach. Internally, incorporating foods rich in oils, such as those containing omega fatty acids, can be beneficial, as it is thought the best beauty begins within. To further the treatment, topically applied products that support or mimic the skin’s natural oil secretions can be highly effective. Seek out formulations with keywords like nutrition and nourishment to replenish the skin’s oil barrier and encourage overall skin health.

While it’s possible to experience both dehydration and dryness simultaneously, Turner advises tailoring your approach based on the severity of each condition. Some individuals may find products that address both concerns simultaneously, while others may benefit from focusing on one more intensively, using products with key ingredients designed to target their skin’s unique needs.

Hydrating Intensive Serum
from Sothys
Nutritive Replenishing Cream
from Sothys

For those seeking the best skincare products to aid in their skin’s recovery, Turner recommends Sothys’ Hydra4 Moisturising Range for dehydration and their Nutritive Nourishing Range for dryness. Sothys, renowned for its luxurious and effective formulations, has meticulously developed these lines to provide targeted solutions for each concern, ensuring optimal, long-lasting results.

And while simply knowing and understanding these conditions is important, Turner also encourages seeking out professional guidance if you’re to address every aspect of your skin’s needs. Determining whether your skin is dry or dehydrated can be a challenging and frustrating process without expert advice. Consulting a beauty therapist or skincare professional will steer you in the right direction, helping you identify the ideal ingredients and products, while also taking into account the seasonal and climatic factors that can impact your skin.

Understanding the distinction between dehydration and dryness empowers you to take proactive steps in maintaining and improving the health of your skin. Armed with this insight (and some new products to add to your routine), you can embrace a skincare routine that addresses your unique skin, ensuring a luminous and supple complexion year-round that is neither dehydrated nor dry.

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Celebrating the best of the season ahead, our highly-anticipated Winter Issue is finally here!

An essential companion for making it through the winter season is the new issue of Denizen, available now. Covered by the impressive Spanish actor Elsa Pataky, this issue delves into everything we should be getting excited about over the coming months, including an explicit guide on how to survive the cold season (from essential recipes to hot-tub etiquette), and a rundown of the most soul-warming spicy dishes to indulge in as the weather gets chilly.

From Elsa Pataky to iconic designer Patricia Urquiola, to lauded Kiwi author Eleanor Catton (whose new book is already a runaway success), to the incredible local ecopreneur Suzan Craig (who not only has a mānuka honey and natural skincare line but whose ecological restoration work on her land up north has had huge environmental impacts), we have profiled a range of intriguing people whose achievements across design, fashion, food, wellbeing and culture are sure to leave you feeling inspired and motivated.

Elsewhere we have curated a dedicated Jewellery and Watch Special (guest-edited by Vanity Fair contributor Annabel Davidson) that runs through the biggest news and most important trends being touted by the key brands in this space, from Bulgari to Van Cleef & Arpels to Tiffany & Co. and more. And if it’s sartorial inspiration you’re after, you’ll find it on the rest of our coveted pages, which include a skiwear special and a photoshoot featuring the most exquisite jewellery pieces from Van Cleef & Arpels.

In design, we wrap-up the best new pieces that came out of this year’s exceptional Milan Design Week, alongside offering a first-hand review of Maserati’s impressive Levante Trofeo. While over in Culture, find all the best things to read, to watch and to listen to over winter. Trust us, theses are the best ways to while away the inclement days.

That said, if it’s travel you’re seeking this season, in Navigator, we take you around the world to some incredible places worthy of booking for a special, milestone holiday (whether a birthday with friends, an elegant elopement, an engagement or any occasion deserving of a memorable escape). From private retreats to super yacht charters to architectural destinations, these unique holidays will see you make memories that will last a lifetime.

So pick up your own copy of Denizen’s new winter issue now (or subscribe here) and cosy up for the best seasonal read around. With Denizen as your guide, there’s much to be excited about in the coming winter months.

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