Our show-stopping spring issue is on sale now

“Over the years, I’ve tried it all…” begins Editor-in-Chief of Denizen, Claire Sullivan, in her latest Editor’s Letter, referring to her personal history with exercise in all its unglamorous, inescapable glory. And haven’t we all; extreme diets and outlandish fitness fads are what govern our culture, what bind women together and unite men in friendship. But there’s also the matter of ‘everything in moderation’ for sanity’s sake too.

The pursuit of wellness and a well-balanced lifestyle is universal and unrelenting, and it’s something we throw ourselves into with fervour here at Denizen. Hence, with springtime upon us, we chose to put a spotlight on the topic in our ravishing new issue. Beginning with the celebration of ‘fine form’ on our two covers, shot by Jake Terrey, the spring volume explores how to approach bio-hacking with good measure, delves into the microdosing trend, and gets up-close and personal with Auckland’s current nouveau-fitness gurus.

With so much more to inspire and galvanise — including an extensive insider’s guide to NYC, a comprehensive design section and a run-down on the latest in fashion and culture — we’re quite sure you’ll find this issue as sensational as we do.

Denizen’s new spring issue has two different feature covers. Pick a copy from a decent newsagent near you, or click here to subscribe. 

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The Big Curl: Why my first ever perm was also my last ever perm

I was not a child of the 80s — as much as I would have loved Pat Benatar and Devo to be the soundtrack to my childhood, my experience with something as iconically 80s as the perm was limited. But I knew three things for certain.

The first was the infamous courthouse scene from Legally Blonde where Elle Woods won her case by catching her witness out in a perm-related porkie. Her victorious moment came as she proclaimed (unravelling Chutney Windham’s alibi) “isn’t the first cardinal rule of perm maintenance that you’re forbidden to wet your hair for at least 24 hours after getting a perm at the risk of deactivating the ammonium thioglycolate?” Maybe it was the David v. Goliath-esque win for the underdog or the fact that as a young, blonde girl watching it, I felt that I could do anything, but for some reason, it was a moment that stuck with me.

Secondly, I knew that, despite the myriad of celebrity endorsements praising the perm in its heyday, the eventual popularity of ‘The Rachel’ (a.k.a the hairstyle that defined the 90s) birthed an era of chemical straightening, and curls were left to the cutting room floor.

Lastly, I noticed that the perm was experiencing something of a revival. After noting a friend’s effortlessly tousled tresses cascading in beachy waves to her shoulders (it was the kind of style I could only hope to achieve with a curling tong, a can-do attitude and some kind of miracle) she spoke two words that would change the course of my hair for the foreseeable future… “gentle perm”.

A perm that didn’t result in the kind of fro only appropriate for the dancefloor of Studio 54. A decidedly chill perm. It seemed to herald a new age of hair transformation that I knew I had to be a part of.

After skimming over some Google results for “can I get a perm with coloured hair” and tactically picking out the “maybes” and “why nots”, I booked in with one of the only salons in Auckland purporting to provide the treatment.

Sitting in the chair I felt the spirit of Elle Woods and the echoes of her courtroom triumph blessing this new step on my hair journey as I, with hopeful anticipation, became a new woman.

It felt right despite the questionable Google results. It felt right despite the godawful burnt-hair smell of the chemical solution as it was poured over my head.

It stopped feeling so right when it started to dry… more Phil Spector at his trial than Victoria’s Secret model.

But it wasn’t until the next morning, upon waking to assess my new look that I realised I had made a terrible mistake. The top layer of my short hair was sticking out from my head in a kind of triangular helmet. Thick, frizzy and more or less still (disappointingly) straight, it was only the bottom layer (the uncoloured section of my hair) that had morphed into the curls I wanted all over. Which was fantastic considering it was the only part no one could see.

Saying a silent prayer in the name of Reese Witherspoon, I jumped in the shower. It was a deliberate breaking of the only rule of perm maintenance in an attempt to very much deactivate the effects of the ammonium thioglycolate that had turned me into Sideshow Bob. It was futile.

Without going into the science of the whole sorry affair, showering out my gentle perm was about as productive as trying to straighten my hair with a shirt iron, and for a significant while after, my once luscious locks sat on my head in a kind of sulky resignation. The old saying is true people. You don’t know what you’ve got until it’s gone.

That said, I’m not trying to rip this trend out by its roots or infer that it doesn’t work at all, but if you are planning a perm, it certainly pays to do your homework. My fatal mistake was ignoring all the stop signs on my path to the curly gates. On the right hair, this treatment could result in beautifully textured waves that frame the face and relieve the hassle of the morning routine.

As for me, there was nothing left to do but accept my fate with as much grace as I could muster (after months of damage control it’s starting to return to normal). Maybe next time I’ll throw caution to the wind and cut it all off…but we’ll leave that to another day.

Wellbeing


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This is why you should be taking probiotics, according to a Naturopath

Probiotic is the word on everybody’s lips lately, but does anyone actually know what they are, and why we should be taking them?. We speak to Huckleberry‘s head naturopath, Kim Wessels, to understand more about the health trend of the moment.

How can probiotics benefit our health?
Probiotics are live beneficial bacteria and yeasts that help to improve the microflora in the intestinal tract, where around 80-90% of our immune system lies. It’s needed there because the intestinal tract is an open-ended tube that is exposed to the outside world – probiotics help to support and balance the microbes that are already present.

What’s the difference between prebiotics and probiotics?
Prebiotics are non-digestible foods or plant fibres that act as a food for probiotics as well as your own beneficial bacteria. This creates a synergistic relationship where both are needed to promote a good balance of intestinal bacteria.

How can we get more probiotics?
Alongside supplements, foods that have gone through some amount of fermentation or ageing like yoghurt, raw unpasteurised soft cheeses, sauerkraut, miso, kefir, tempeh, kimchi, natto, and sugar-free pickled foods all contain probiotics. Kombucha is also a fermented beverage, however, it’s important to consume in moderation as this food relies on added sugar to keep the bacteria active during fermentation and can still be present in the end product.

Can probiotics have side effects?
Some people can experience gas and loosened bowel motions when first starting a course of probiotics as some unwanted bacteria start to die off. This is your body starting to establish a balance. If you experience stomach pain or worsening of symptoms then stop and seek advice from a natural health practitioner before continuing.

Are different probiotics suited to different types of people? If so, how do you find the most suitable variation?
Every year new research is increasing our knowledge and understanding of various probiotic strains being beneficial for different health issues. It’s quite a science, and manufacturers are now labelling their products more specifically to help us. There is a wide range of probiotics available so it’s best to seek practitioner support when choosing the best one for you.

How often should we consume probiotics?
Read the label of your preferred product first, but in general dosing is usually between 1-2 capsules per day unless prescribed by a practitioner. Some people take a probiotic on an ongoing basis depending on their health status. If you’re not sure what you need have a chat with one of our experienced Naturopath’s at Huckleberry.

Are different probiotics suited to different types of people? If so, how do you find the most suitable variation?
Every year new research is increasing our understanding of various probiotic strains being beneficial for different health issues. It’s quite a science and manufacturers are now labelling their products more specifically to helps us. As there is a wide range of probiotics available it’s best to seek practitioner support when choosing the best one for you.

Wellbeing


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Asahi is turning ski season up a notch with a sublime onsen experience

There’s no better feeling than slicing through the snow beneath a crisp blue sky as the snow-capped peaks that surround the Cardrona Alpine Resort whizz by in a blurry stream. At least, that’s what we thought until we caught wind of Asahi’s game-changing new concept. As of Monday 3rd September, the revered Japanese beer brand will be installing an authentic Japanese bathhouse at the base of the resort for the 2018 Audi quattro Winter Games, and now we’re finding ourselves craving the post-ski aftermatch as much as the skiing itself.

For just five days, keen ski-goers can leave the snowy slopes after a long day of schussing and shredding and enter the warm embrace of a steaming onsen pool, before soaking into a state of utter relaxation — ice cold Asahi Super Dry in hand, of course. Bathrobes and towels are complimentary, while the nearby Asahi Noodle Bar will keep your cockles warm and your belly full with piping hot, mouth-watering Asian delights by the tray load.

For those who prefer to remain indoors, the Cardrona Alpine Resort will be serving up a glorious, Japanese inspired winter menu by the comfort of the roaring fire — no swimsuit necessary. While entry to the Asahi onsen pool is free, we recommend booking in quick for spots are extremely limited and we’re expecting them to disappear fast.

Asahi Onsen pool is free for all Cardrona Lift Pass holders, with six 45 minute sessions daily for six people at a time, from 9am – 4pm. For more information and bookings, click here

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5 excellent artworks to buy for under $5,000

While a lot of expensive art is good, good art doesn’t need to be outrageously expensive. Still enough to be a sound investment but not so much that you need to take out a second mortgage, here are some of our favourite artworks available for under $5,000.

1. David Cauchi ‘Dive’ — $3,800

2018, oil, watercolour and coloured pencil on linen, 400 x 300mm

Cauchi’s avant-garde works are nothing less than irresistible. The Wellington-based artist imbues his work with cartoonish humour, straddling the line between drawing and painting. We love the whimsicality of this piece, where the subject appears in freefall. www.ivananthony.com

2. Peter Gouge ‘B.W.D.W.V.H.D.’ — $2,300

2017, Oil on jute on board, 355 × 280mm

At first glance, you might think Gouge has used tape, but a closer look reveals idiosyncrasies that say he hasn’t. Here, a contrast-rich, high-key juxtaposition of bold black, primary blue, and pastels form a pixelated pattern; this conversation-starting piece is a shrewd way to brighten your collection. www.melanierogergallery.com

3. Lindsay Malay ‘Bulgundi (Homeland)’ — $1850

2018, Natural ochre and pigments on canvas, 700 x 500mm

Lindsay Malay is an Aboriginal artist whose paintings represent his ancestors’ methods of communication prior to the written word. His works allude to geography; places where water could be found; good hunting spots and the animals that could be found there. Here he uses natural ochre to create an intriguing blueprint of place expressed in a fundamental, indigenous way. www.timmelville.co.nz

4. Conor Clarke ‘Veil of the Soul’ — $5000 

2018, Pigment ink on Hahnemuhle Baryta paper, 930mm x 740mm

‘Veil of the Soul’ is part of Clarke’s most recent show, which saw her turn her lens to water as both a physical substance and point of urban contention. This particular piece, however, pertains to the artist’s fascination with landscapes and our detachment from them. She cites Edgar Allen Poe who suggests that we can, “at any time double the true beauty of an actual landscape by half closing our eyes as we look at it,” and that “the naked senses sometimes see too little — but then again, they always see too much”. www.tworooms.co.nz

5. Cruz Jimenez ‘Light up the Dark’ — $4,250

2017, mixed media on paper, 1210 x 795mm

Described as an ‘artist, mystic and contemporary clairvoyant’, Jimenez’s most recent paintings have been noted for their evocative content; brooding darkness seems to be his current lexicon. With an “innate ability to translate the narrative of his inner life into the visual language of the natural world,” as his Auckland gallery Sanderson describes it, the strength of the image with its bold form is starkly juxtaposed against the fragility of the paper canvas. www.sanderson.co.nz

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Alice Herald is the New Zealand jewellery designer you need to know about

Creating bespoke jewellery and beautiful collections under her eponymous label, Alice Herald not only has a wealth of experience handling diamonds and precious stones but is increasingly garnering attention both locally and internationally for her eye-catching designs.

After exhibiting a love for creative pursuits from a young age, Herald’s passion for jewellery was cemented after studying sculpture and jewellery at the renowned Instituto d’Allende in Mexico. Following the completion of a subsequent BA Hons in jewellery design at Central Saint Martins, this passion carried her and her collections around the world, from being featured on the catwalks of London Fashion Week, to working with goldsmiths for the Royal Family, to gracing the pages of Vogue and now back to New Zealand, where she calls Wanaka home.

Soar and Fly Tsavorite earrings from Alice Herald

Describing her beautiful jewellery as “a window to my mind,” Herald’s creative approach is rooted in her attention to detail and emphasis on quality. Imbuing her pieces with a “fierce, quiet strength and bold beauty” Herald explains how she enjoys “playing with contrast and proportion” in her work. Her Quill earring, a feature of her recent collection ‘Night Flight’ was designed to be a “stud by day and transformed into a full drop, statement earring for the evening.” It’s this “desire for uniqueness” that draws people to Herald’s intricate aesthetic. “Designing a collection,” she explains “is me telling a part of my story”, and it’s this emotional connection to the process that results in a finished piece that “ignites emotion in its wearer.”

Left to right: Soar earrings and Quill earrings from Alice Herald
Sunset Drop earrings from Alice Herald

Herald plays with the geometric contrast between refined curves and jutting angles, as well as employing colours that she says reflect her beautiful South-Island surrounds. “We get this incredible light playing over the mountains and lake when the sun sets,” she explains, “the graduating colours from reds and oranges to pinks and yellows of the Australian sapphires and rubies in the jewels from my Sunset Collection were directly inspired by this.” It imbues her pieces with a soft, sincere elegance that render them show-stopping yet undeniable subtle. 

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These 7 essential oils have life-changing properties

Essential oils have long been hailed as the answer to optimum physical and psychological wellbeing, with aromatherapy touted as the remedy to everything from mental health to bodily ailments. These are the seven essential oils you need to be introducing into your life, STAT.

Lavender 
There’s a reason why your nan waxes lyrical about lavender. Massaging the oil onto sore muscles and painful joints can help alleviate pain, while adding a few drops into moisturiser can help with skin conditions such as acne or eczema. The multi-faceted floral can be also be used to reduce anxiety and relax the brain, simultaneously serving as a serious sleep inducer.

Peppermint
Spring is just around the corner, and with it, a deluge of sniffles, sneezes and streaming noses. Not to fear, my hayfever prone friends, for peppermint can help to fight seasonal allergies. Fight nature with nature and add a drop or two to your tea, its soothing properties will relieve nasal and sinus congestion.

Frankincense
If all you know about Frankincense is its necessary requirement in pre-school nativity plays, prepare to be informed. Also known as olibanum, Frankincense is an oil that is extracted from the gum or resin of its namesake tree and has been known to reduce pain and inflammation, boost the immune system and even improve memory.

Bergamot
Bergamot is the unofficial essential oil for depression, we’ll have you know. While, of course, it doesn’t cure the mental health disorder, it has been used as a complementary therapy alongside other conventional treatments thanks to its anxiety and stress-reducing qualities.

Mandarin
There’s a reason the delightfully cheery scent of mandarin usually wafts around your nose mid-massage, for mandarin essential oil is used by aromatherapists as a general tonic to help with stress and tension and is also added to massage blends to help boost circulation and reduce water retention.

Eucalyptus
Spring is just around the corner, but those winter ails are still lurking around like a serious bad smell. Eucalyptus is the hero of all heroes when it comes to curing ailments, the oil’s therapeutic benefits are antibacterial, they reduce aches and pains and relieve the senses. To clear those nasal passages, add 10-15 drops of eucalyptus oil to a bowl of boiling water before breathing in the soothing vapours.

Chamomile
Can’t sleep? Chamomile it is, the oil works to promote sleep and treat insomnia. To truly inspire lights out with a one-two punch, diffuse some chamomile oil while kicking back and drinking a hot chamomile brew, expect to be on the road to dreamland in no time.

Wellbeing


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Denizen Everyday Heroes 2021: Auckland’s favourite facialist, as voted by you

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Tom Gould’s exhibition ‘Decade’ graces NZFW for Huffer’s 21st birthday showcase

For those who don’t know Tom Gould, he’s an Auckland-bred photographer and director who, 10 years ago, moved Stateside to take on The Big Apple. In that time, he has achieved notable acclaim, working with the likes of Ralph Lauren, capturing the brand in all its street glory via the sellout coffee table book Bury Me With the Lo On, directing video clips for Queens rapper Action Bronson, and serving as the videographer for his cult TV series F*ck That’s Delicious. His work has been exhibited globally including at MoMA, ICA and the British Film Institute, and has graced a good number of fine print publications.

Basically, he’s a cool cat who also happens to be a long-time friend of Huffer. Which is why part of Gould’s most recent exhibition ‘Decade’ will be entwined in Huffer’s 21st birthday showcase taking place next week as part of fashion week. Honing in on the creative’s 10 years in NYC, the works selected to come to New Zealand for the brand’s Thursday night event at The Powerstation — a quintessential 90s gig setting designed to take attendees back to the beginning — are those that reflect Huffer’s own appreciation for true locals, the people who make any town, street or city what it is.

Capturing the likes of Bronson, Bronson’s right-hand man The Alchemist and Kiwi fitness guru Kirsty Godso, the works will be on display at The Powerstation and up for sale the next day with Huffer show attendees having first dibs. Fusing fashion with art, culture and a sense of provenance, the hotly anticipated event, which will see acclaimed American rapper Desiigner perform at the afterparty, will cult to the core of the beloved street brand’s ethos.

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An immersive bar and eatery has picked up where The Golden Dawn left off

It is with much anticipation that we have awaited the filling of the boots left by legendary Ponsonby watering hole, The Golden Dawn (Tavern of Power). The successor has finally shown itself; Hoppers, opening tomorrow, is a bar and eatery that marries some of GD’s quirky good-time traits with a whimsical theme we can’t quite put our finger on.

Owner-operators are sister duo Bronwyn and Jessica Payne have spruced the space up, playing on the concept of ‘hopped beer in a peculiar garden’. It resides in what was formerly the outdoor area while the interior is now home to Kate Sylvester’s new store. Covered by a permanent, semi-transparent roof, an abundance of greenery along with different coloured doorways and walls adorned with portraits of dapper Mr Animals add to the idea of this being a place to escape. A greenhouse of curiosities if you will.

Serving lunch and dinner every day, while Hoppers is a freehouse whose drinks menu is of utmost importance, their food, all seemingly with a fresh Asian bent, is a good enough reason in itself to head along for dinner (think bao buns, dumplings, sticky pork ribs, soft shell crab etc). Spanning the entirety of the back wall, the new bar gives way to 18 different types of craft beer, top quality liquor (we weren’t surprised to find out they had a penchant for gin), a variety of biodynamic and organic wines, and carefully crafted cocktails.

The team behind the operation appears to be passionate, hands-on and adept. Committed to the quality of the experience, they hope to one day start brewing their own beer and promise there will be an entertainment element at Hoppers. “We invite all to be a part of this iconic space that has previously housed so many varieties of entertainment,” the sisters say.

Positing themselves as the perfect spot for drinks and a casual dinner, and everything in between, Ponsonby has every reason to be intrigued about this distinctive new address.

Opening hours: 
7 days, 12pm till late

Hoppers

134 Ponsonby Road
Ponsonby
Auckland

www.hoppersgardenbar.co.nz

Gastronomy


Skip the stress this festive season with the city’s most enticing Christmas Eve and Christmas Day dining events

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Asahi presents a theatrical Japanese dining experience like no other

While we’re familiar with the habitual concept of ‘dinner and a show’, we’re a little less au fait with dinner actually being the show. However, such a notion is currently being explored via a fun-filled, experimental pop-up unfolding within K’ Road’s Las Vegas institution. Asahi presents Akai Doa — or ‘red door’ in Japanese. Launched in August to much acclaim, Akai Doa is living up to expectations of being a theatrical ‘dinner experience like nothing else’.

Beyond the crimson doorway, guests ascend into the familiar space where the food and chef become part of the show. Once seated, awaiting a menu designed by Yukio Ozeki (of Ebisu, Azabu acclaim) and his team, the chef assumes his role as the evening’s maestro — front and centre on stage. The experience comes together from being seated in the historical venue, where there’s an immersive soundtrack with accompanying projections, and finally, a multi-course omakase menu from Chef Yukio. Asahi beer is seamlessly infused throughout the menu. From Asahi dusted popcorn through to Asahi black jelly, the beer is incorporated in the most unexpected ways.

When each night’s gastronomic theatrics are over, the restaurant transforms into a revelrous cocktail lounge — a loud and naughty locale with a late-night revelry. The pop up is only open Thursday to Saturday with one sitting each night. If there’s one thing we can count on, it’s that Akai Doa is elevating our expectations of Japanese hospitality with a memorable night out.

Due to popular demand, the Asahi presents Akai Doa experience has been extended until 21st December with new tickets just released. Late night surprises are also said to be in store for the silly season ahead. Dinner is $85 per person. To book, click here.

Las Vegas

339 Karangahape Rd
Auckland

www.asahiakaidoa.co.nz

Gastronomy


Skip the stress this festive season with the city’s most enticing Christmas Eve and Christmas Day dining events

win

Win: Have you been to Bar Magda yet? Now’s your chance as we’re giving away a delicious meal for six

Bar Non Solo is the convivial new bar bringing the spirit of Italian nightlife to Britomart