Antonio Lopez, Corey Tippin and Donna Jordan, Saint-Tropez, 1970

Architecture & Design Film Festival: 3 films that will change the way you view the world

Running from May 3rd-20th at Auckland’s Rialto Cinemas, the Resene Architecture & Design Film Festival 2018 is offering creative fodder so good it will change the way you think. With insights from creative legends such as Japanese architect Tadao Ando, inspiration in the form of fashion illustrator Antonio Lopez, and an informed look at the current state of sustainability, there is certainly something for everyone this year.

Samurai Architect: Tadao Ando
As it shadows the self-taught Japanese architect for one year, this film delves into the 72-year-old’s creative process, incorrigible character and minimalist masterpieces. As you are taken on a tour of some of his greatest works, the audience is privy to the sharp mind and wicked sense of humour that belie his legendary practice.

Antonio Lopez 1970: Sex, Fashion & Disco
Launching us into one of our favourite style epochs, the 60s and 70s, Sex, Fashion & Disco is a documentary marked by the era’s desire for diversity. Puerto Rican-born fashion illustrator Antonio Lopez was based in the Bronx and became renowned as much for his work as for his inimitable sense of style. Following Lopez as he moves in circles with Bill Cunningham, Grace Jones and Jerry Hall, this is archival footage at its finest.

Living in the Future’s Past
If there’s anything to make us sit up and listen, it is the voice of acting great Jeff Bridges. Here, he works with director Susan Kucera to bring us an entirely unique exploration of the delicacies of our environment and nuances of nature in our rapidly changing world. Looking forward, it asks the compelling question: what kind of future would you like to see?

Click here to view the ADFF programme. Click here to book session times.
Image credit: Juan Ramos © Copyright The Estate of Antonio Lopez and Juan Ramos, 2012

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This waterfront home in Sydney is seriously ahead of the curve

Reflecting the undulating curves of the vast body of water it overlooks, this modern home in Sydney’s beachfront suburb of Tamarama, is bending the rules. Conceived by Luigi Rosselli Architects, the house used the strong foundations of its previous structure, including the stoic, sandstone front wall, while turning into something wholly unique.

Employing natural materials and a neutral colour palette, Rosselli utilised curvature to lend this house a soft sense of refinement, while imbuing it with eye-catching design. The use of off-white concrete, sandstone, natural timbers and simple, intricate detailing makes the home as relaxing to be in as it is to look at.

Mantis Floor Lamp available from Backhouse, B&B Italia Arne Sofa available from Matisse

Inside, the curve motif continues, with a wavy kitchen bench, curved walls and a distinctly architectural fireplace that mirrors the structure around it. The house feels like it is bending around and embracing those within it.

Not only a feat of contemporary design, this incredibly realised house is reflecting and reacting to its environment — and shows us why it isn’t so bad to deviate from the straight and narrow every now and then.

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This transparent furniture trend is a stylish exercise in creative contradiction

Melding modern lines with a romantic garden outlook, this home is the epitome of quietly confident luxury

How to master the art of conversation

As much as you would like to hide in the toilets at work events/parties/family dinners, seeking sanctuary from the social angst that is so synonymous with the like, the art of conversation with your fellow attendees is a necessity to succeed in almost every aspect of life. Here are six cardinal rules to set you on your way to becoming a smooth talker and an accomplished conversationalist.

A strong first impression
It has been said that first impressions are made within a seven-second window, establish a connection from the outset with openness and warmth to create an environment of trust. Tip: Showing more interest in the person opposite you rather than vocally assaulting them with who you are is sure to get any interaction off to a roaring start.

Do the dance
And we don’t mean whisking your new acquaintance away for a foxtrot. No, this dance is the figurative one we do upon first meeting to get a better sense of character. What are her views on this? How does he respond when I say that? It is the essential foreplay to understanding whether two people have anything in common, confirming whether the ensuing conversation will be fraught or engaging.

Ease into intimacy
When progressing past the initial stages of small talk, do not, for heaven’s sake, see this as a green light to lunch into heavy questioning. Only after a mutual camaraderie is established will the impulse to discuss feelings naturally materialise — it’s the old adage of leading a horse to water. There’s no point in trying to elicit something from someone who is not yet ready to give.

Listening is key 
This truly means listening and reacting in real time. Never pretend to listen. We’ve all done it — a conversation partner alludes to something for which you have a fitting anecdote, resulting in your only listening in order to determine an opportune moment to cut in. It’s an easy path to follow, especially when dealing with particularly loquacious individuals. Trust us when we say that listening will afford you the intriguing insights you crave and allow for authentic connection. Be sure to talk to someone rather than at them. Put the megaphone away and chomp down on a slice of humble pie — no one wants to be lectured.

Open your mind
Entering a discussion with preconceived notions of who someone is or where they are coming from will never result in fruitful chemistry. The conversation is already over before it has begun, so disregard what you consider acceptable and allow yourself the opportunity to see things from another’s perspective. Even if it pains you, the learning will prove invaluable.

Exit with elegance 
should you want to bring a conversation to a premature end, ensure you do so with class. Make a conclusive, positive comment summarising the interaction, or invite a third party to the conversation and gradually slip silently into the shadows. A polite excuse to do with some previous or sudden engagement is a no-brainer: ‘I’m so sorry Ruth, but I think my house is on fire and I must hasten home,” or even “Thank you, Jenny, for asking me at length about my recent breakup. I’m afraid I have to go home now and stick a fork in my eye.” Subtle and believable.

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Tulum’s breathtaking answer to the Guggenheim has just opened

Conceived by designer Jorge Eduardo Neira Sterkel, a former painter with no specific background in architecture and Rumeny Guggenheim, the great-grandson of Peggy Guggenheim, this incredibly intricate and earthy new arts and cultural space is offering a unique experience in the heart of Tulum. Erected on Sterkel’s eco-resort, Azulik — despite its prolific use of timber, no trees were cut during construction — IK Lab sits on stilts so as to allow the surrounding wildlife to pass, unaffected.

Walls of vines cause natural, speckled light to filter onto the distinctive walkways and curved interiors, while the twisting, undulating floors and doorways create the sense that this is, in many ways, an anti-gallery — far removed from the clean lines and neutral colours that frame most art spaces of today.

Having recently opened its first exhibition, future plans for IK Lab include utilising it for art workshops for local children, as well as it becoming a multidisciplinary residency space for aspiring artists, fashion designers, chefs, musicians and more.

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Bluebells Cakery opens its crisp new Kingsland outpost today

If we were to play the word association game, starting with the word ‘cupcakes’, our answer would come easily: ‘Bluebells’. The ubiquitous, six-year-old cakery has come as close as it gets to building an empire here in Auckland, topping out at three different locations across the city. Yet a new business directive has seen creator Karla Goodwin and her team taking a more ‘focussed’ approach, opening a new outpost in Kingsland that will absorb both the Takapuna and Eden Terrace stores.

The squeaky-clean spot on New North Road can fairly be considered a tea room. Dainty tables, navy blue booths and a pastel-infused interior, that has become Goodwin’s calling card, will not disappoint diehard Bluebells fans. With the mandatory cabinet mainstage brimming with cakes of every kind, artisan teas to be ordered and savoury snacks for those after something more lunch-like, this might just be Bluebells at its best yet.

Bluebells Kingsland

361 New North Road
Kingsland

www.bluebellscakery.com

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Things you always wanted to ask a tattoo artist, with Tritoan Ly of Seventh Day

Once a full-time break dance teacher who did fashion and wedding photography on the side, Tritoan Ly of Seventh Day has bounced around the creative sphere to have now become one of Auckland’s favourite tattoo artists. Of Cambodian-Chinese heritage, his work is intricate and light-of-hand. Here we find out about his practice, as well as a few things we always wanted to ask a tattoo artist.

How would you describe your style of tattooing? How do you think it differs from everyone else? I’d like to think I am a bit of an allrounder bouncing from fine lines, realism, dot work and colour. But I am more well known for my fine line floral work. Where I think I do differently to other artist is composition. Anyone can learn to draw flowers, what’s difficult is composing elements to a design to flow with the body.

Did you learn tattoo artistry or are you completely self-taught? I was self-taught, starting in the kitchen of my apartment for 6 months. I was desperate to go pro, willing to become an apprentice at any tattoo shop. I handed in my portfolio to a studio in the city called Dream Hands where they graciously accepted me to the team as a full-time artist instead. There I learnt the ins and outs of the tattoo industry and worked there for a year before opening my own shop.

What was the first tattoo you did? Do you still like it when you look back? My very first was a stick and poke I did on myself when I was 11. My classmate stole some Indian ink from the art room while I pinched my mum’s sewing needle. I’m not sure if that counts as my first as it was not done by machine. My very first one with a machine was on a good friend of mine Tristan. He was the one who encouraged me to pursue tattooing and offered his skin for me to tattoo. It was a tiny paper crane on his chest. Every time I see him now, he gives me shit about how tragic the tattoo is. It’s all fond memories. So yes I do like it. Am I proud of it? Definitely not.

On a scale from 1 to 10, how stressful is it being a tattoo artist? Does the fact that it’s permanent and quite irreversible put more pressure on you? I remember for the first year I would constantly be so anxious about tattooing, not just about putting in a clean line but more so if the clients would like what I had designed them. I’m at a point now where it is second nature to me, so I don’t get nervous nowadays. And clients come to me already knowing my style and what to expect.

How do you cope with shaky hands? Depends how bad it is! Practice makes perfect. You shoot a basketball in a hoop enough times, you’re bound to improve.

Have you ever refused to proceed with an appointment because you didn’t like the design or disagreed with an idea? We do turn away a lot of work. Our priority is our artwork and money is an incentive. So to stay passionate I will only accept jobs that I think resonates with me and my style. It’s not ideal having an artist do a job he dislikes. Some people do get offended, not understanding the concept that tattooist are also proud artists so they would prefer not to take on all jobs. At the same time I do believe you should get what you really want as a tattoo, but get it done with the right artist.

Do you think that we’ve moved on from the stereotype that people with easily visible tattoos (neck, hands, arms, ankles) shouldn’t pursue corporate careers? I think in the past it was an issue, especially from my mum’s point of view, the older generation sees it as a criminal association. The yakuza’s had such an impact on Japan’s society; to this day you can not go into public pools without covering your tattoos. Honestly, I think there is a different generation coming through and it’s most certainly becoming more acceptable, especially in New Zealand as we are a very relaxed country. I think people in the corporate world would still be prone to having their employees cover their tattoos when it comes to the more visible areas but I think this will die out going forward. In my honest opinion, it’s up to the employee whether they want to hire someone with neck tattoos or not. Their business, they can do as they please.

What advice would you give to people who are thinking about getting their first tattoo? Research your artist, find someone who has a style that resonates with you. And just have fun with it.

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Sweater Weather: the new sweatshirts of the season

Over the last few weeks, we have begrudgingly started to accept the fact that we can’t get away with the old short and t-shirt combo that saw us through summer. And although the jeans have come out of retirement, and our trusty winter boots are back on the scene, a light sweater is about all the insulation needed for temperature control at this time of year.

The perfect inbetween piece, the sweatshirt can be worn by itself, with day-to-day outfits, over gym gear or under coats for particularly crisp mornings. It is the gold standard in versatile dressing.  Helping you manage the seasonal transition in style, we round up some of our favourite functional and fashion-forward sweatshirts.

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P.E Nation Over & Under sweat

P.E Nation Over & Under sweat

P.E Nation Over & Under sweat

P.E Nation Over & Under sweat

From Superette

Saint Laurent crewneck sweater

Saint Laurent crewneck sweater

Saint Laurent crewneck sweater

Saint Laurent crewneck sweater

From Matches Fashion

Printed cotton-jersey sweatshirt

Printed cotton-jersey sweatshirt

Printed cotton-jersey sweatshirt

Printed cotton-jersey sweatshirt

From Gucci

Workshop Denim crewneck sweatshirt (Aotearoa patch)

Workshop Denim crewneck sweatshirt (Aotearoa patch)

Workshop Denim crewneck sweatshirt (Aotearoa patch)

Workshop Denim crewneck sweatshirt (Aotearoa patch)

From Workshop

Printed cotton-jersey sweatshirt

Printed cotton-jersey sweatshirt

Printed cotton-jersey sweatshirt

Printed cotton-jersey sweatshirt

From Gucci

Acne Studios sweatshirt

Acne Studios sweatshirt

Acne Studios sweatshirt

Acne Studios sweatshirt

From Mr Porter

P.E Nation By The Book knit

P.E Nation By The Book knit

P.E Nation By The Book knit

P.E Nation By The Book knit

From Superette

WORLDman Lancelot pullover jersey

WORLDman Lancelot pullover jersey

WORLDman Lancelot pullover jersey

WORLDman Lancelot pullover jersey

From WORLD

Burberry jersey sweatshirt

Burberry jersey sweatshirt

Burberry jersey sweatshirt

Burberry jersey sweatshirt

From Mr Porter

Kelvin Street Sweat

Kelvin Street Sweat

Kelvin Street Sweat

Kelvin Street Sweat

From Rodd & Gunn

Workshop Denim crewneck sweatshirt

Workshop Denim crewneck sweatshirt

Workshop Denim crewneck sweatshirt

Workshop Denim crewneck sweatshirt

From Workshop

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Huckleberry’s new Honey has us championing breakfast like never before

Whether doused over a saturated acai bowl, slathered over a crunchy piece of Midnight Baker loaf (pictured above with labneh and hazelnuts) or combined with our pre-breakfast lemon water, our love for the delectable sweet liquid gold isn’t set to cease anytime soon. Especially since we found out that organic retailer Huckleberry is finally bringing us its first-ever season of Huckleberry Honey.

Forever championing the realms of the raw and the natural, their unique take on the sweet stuff sees it untouched, unprocessed and delivered directly from their very own hives in the winterless Northland. Encompassing a rich floral flavour, this deliciously runny preserve will be our go-to spreadable for the foreseeable future. We suggest you get stuck in.

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Kendrick Lamar’s newly announced tour dates will be the biggest act to hit NZ this year

There is arguably no better way to come off the back of a midweek break than with news that Pulitzer Prize-winning rapper Kendrick Lamar is coming to New Zealand. Announcing dates in Dunedin and Auckland for the 17th and 19th of July respectively, tickets will go on sale here at midday on Monday 30th April.

Lamar recently changed the course of American music history by winning the prestigious Pulitzer award for music by virtue of his masterfully lyrical tracks on his latest album and tour namesake DAMN. In the past, the prize has exclusively gone to classical and jazz musicians. With an acclaimed catalogue that includes his work on recent Marvel film Black Panther, a haul of five Grammy Awards, and over 13 billion streams on Spotify alone, Lamar is easily one of the most important names in music of the 21st Century.

Incorporating a headline act at Byron Bay’s Splendour in the Grass on his visit down under, you best not stray far from your computer come Monday if you fancy a chance at securing tickets.

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Karavan is Devonport’s cafe newcomer serving delicious daytime fare

Tucked away on Devonport’s Wynyard Street, a grittier, more industrial avenue than the historic main street, Karavan is the latest addition to the suburb’s culinary scene. Built around an ethos of keeping things local, it comfortably fits into the melting pot of activity where mixed-use apartments sit cheek-by-jowl with motor repair shops, boat builders and commercial offices.

The concept for the cafe grew out of The Little Village Grocer, which closed last year. The pair behind the project — ex-environmental and local government lawyer Brianna Parkinson and her husband Michael Kwok, who completed the fitout — wanted to keep the best parts of the grocer (local cheeses and cured meats, Peoples Coffee and West Coast Cocoa) and add in a full cafe menu.

This they did with a simple, produce-driven array of eats, some of which exhibit a Middle Eastern bent. A signature dish, for example, is the Shakshuka — slow roasted heirloom tomatoes from Eighty-four Ltd paired with L’Authentique merguez sausages, house-made labneh and free-range eggs. Best Ugly Bagels are also on offer using many of the components that are made in-house — jams and chutneys as well as labneh and sauces too. With much of the produce procured from the Parnell Farmers Market and other ingredients sourced from the country’s best artisans, the menu and cabinet are abounding with some of the best local food on offer.

Light and bright, with a soft industrial edge to suit its environs, Karavan is a cafe with integrity that we can imagine the community is thankful for. Beckoning with its friendly, approachable vibe, if you’re in the area, you know where to go.

Karavan

12 Wynyard Street
Devonport
Auckland

(09) 307 0091

Gastronomy


From perfect pasta to mouthwatering mezze, these are the best comfort food takeaways to order right now

This new Miann opening is bringing the sweet life to Ponsonby Central

Treat yourself to a Powersurge online shop, and receive a generous restaurant voucher for paying it forward